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Cheney backs Limbaugh over Colin Powell as GOP leader

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by ConcordCowboy, May 11, 2009.

  1. ConcordCowboy

    ConcordCowboy Mr. Buckeye

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    Cheney backs Limbaugh over Powell

    He says he'd rather back broadcaster in the battle over future of the GOP


    WASHINGTON - Dick Cheney made clear Sunday he'd rather follow firebrand broadcaster Rush Limbaugh than former Joint Chiefs chairman Colin Powell into political battle over the future of the Republican Party.

    Even as Cheney embraced efforts to expand the party by ex-Govs. Jeb Bush of Florida and Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and the House's No. 2 Republican, Virginia Rep. Eric Cantor, the former vice president appeared to write his one-time colleague Powell out of the GOP.

    Asked about recent verbal broadsides between Limbaugh and Powell, Cheney said, "If I had to choose in terms of being a Republican, I'd go with Rush Limbaugh. My take on it was Colin had already left the party. I didn't know he was still a Republican."

    'Not as right as others would like'
    Powell, who was secretary of state under President George W. Bush and held the nation's top military post under President George H.W. Bush, endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president last year. Nonetheless, since the election he has described himself as a Republican and a right-of-center conservative, though "not as right as others would like."

    Cheney, citing Powell's backing of Obama over Republican nominee John McCain, said, "I assumed that that is some indication of his loyalty and his interests."

    Cheney's remarks on CBS' "Face the Nation" were the latest step in his slow-motion estrangement from Powell since the two worked closely together to manage the Persian Gulf war in 1991 — Powell as the Army general who was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Cheney as defense secretary for the elder Bush.

    Under the younger Bush, Powell initially backed action against Iraq's Saddam Hussein and delivered a famous U.N. speech laying out the U.S. case. But Powell and Cheney increasingly parted ways over the Bush administration's policies on the war and terrorism, with Cheney usually prevailing. Powell left the administration after Bush's first term.

    Wading into the debate over the GOP's future, Cheney called efforts by George W. Bush's brother Jeb, along with Cantor and Romney, as "a good thing to do," but set a limit on how far the party should go.

    "The suggestion our Democratic friends always make is somehow if you Republicans were just more like Democrats, you'd win elections," Cheney said. "Well, I don't buy that. We win elections when we have good solid conservative principles to run upon."


    More government, not less

    Powell has argued the Republican Party needs to move toward the center and reach out to growing black, Hispanic and Asian communities, but instead has been shrinking because it hasn't changed as the country changed in the face of economic distress. "Americans are looking for more government in their life, not less," Powell said last week.

    For months, Powell has urged the party to turn away from the acid-tongued Limbaugh. "I think what Rush does as an entertainer diminishes the party and intrudes or inserts into our public life a kind of nastiness that we would be better to do without," Powell said.

    "Colin Powell is just another liberal," Limbaugh retorted. "What Colin Powell needs to do is close the loop and become a Democrat." Limbaugh said Powell is "just mad at me because I'm the one person in the country that had the guts to explain his endorsement of Obama. It was purely and solely based on race." Both Powell and Obama are black.

    On other topics on the CBS interview, Cheney:

    said transferring suspected terrorists from the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States would be a bad idea that would enlarge their legal rights. Obama's national security adviser, retired Marine Gen. James Jones, told ABC's "This Week" the White House isn't going to do that if it would make Americans less safe.
    reiterated his belief the U.S. has become more vulnerable to a potential terrorist attack since the Obama administration renounced harsh interrogation tactics such as waterboarding, which simulates drowning, that Cheney said provided good intelligence. Jones said he didn't believe the nation was at greater risk and that even some in the Bush administration disagreed with Cheney on that score.
    renewed his call for the administration to release two CIA memos he said list successes derived from those interrogations, including "attack planning that was under way and how it was stopped." The Obama administration is reviewing Cheney's request. Obama has said the memos are not so clear-cut and do not address whether the information could have been obtained without such methods.
    said he has been speaking out about the Obama administration although George W. Bush remains silent, because if he didn't, "then the critics have free run, and there isn't anybody there on the other side to tell the truth."

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30670941/?GT1=43001
  2. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    and Powell backed Obama is Powell for more Government control?
  3. arglebargle

    arglebargle Well-Known Member

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    Just finished reading a bio of Eisenhower. What I found interesting (and relevant to this) is that everyone was convinced Ike was a shoe in for President, but his real fight was against the very conservative elements of the Republican party, and the Taft machine. Ike was behind by 100 votes at the first votes for nomination.

    Colin Powell is a voice of moderation amongst the Republicans, and if he's not listened too, I think the Republicans will carve out their own little niche. Little -- Niche----

    I know that many of the folks here who are more hard core conservative will not like this sort of thing. But overbroad support of the previous administration, with all its arrogance and flaws, has filtered down to the average voter.

    Of course if the present administration totally screws up, any type of Republican could have a chance.
  4. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    What good is it to win an election if you don't believe in the policy of the person you are voting for? I don't see the Dems backing down or changing their views to accommodate.
  5. Danny White

    Danny White Winter is Coming

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    That's a no-brainer.

    Politically speaking, I would take Limbaugh over Powell 6 days a week and twice on Sunday.

    Powell supported, voted for, and campaigned for Obama... how exactly does this make him a Republican leader?
  6. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    We ran with a moderate in McCain and lost horribly. Powell refused to support a moderate. Instead, Powell supported a radical leftist in Obama. Powell have been a Democrat supporter for some time now. I don't understand why anyone thinks he is a Republican. He won't even support moderate Republican candidates. Forget about those with any strong convictions. He flat out campaigned against the moderate Republicans in his support of a leftist.
  7. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Rush is someone only interested in making dollars and IMO not really all that concerned about anything else.

    With Powell, whether you like his views or not, I think he would work hard and be a team player.

    Either way Rush would not do this if he had to lose out on his radio money.
  8. Rogah

    Rogah Well-Known Member

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    I am surprised at the amount of play this comment is getting. I like Colin Powell, I respect Colin Powell, I think Colin Powell is a great man. I probably would have voted for him if he had decided to run for President.

    But, having said that, if I was a staunch Republican then I probably would not want my party to be led by a guy who openly endorsed a liberal Democrat in our recent Presidential election.
  9. Rogah

    Rogah Well-Known Member

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    I have to respectfully disagree here. I don't want to get into the old argument about whether or not Obama was the single most liberal Senator from the past few years, but fact is he was pretty left leaning. That's not criticism, that's just a fact.

    So when someone comes out and endorses a liberal Democrat over a moderate Republican for President, then that goes a bit beyond being considered "a voice of moderation amongst the Republicans." I mean, that's a guy who has pretty much left the party.

    EDIT: I made this above post before reading what JBond wrote and we seem to be on the same page (though my language may be a little softer than his :D). But I didn't want anyone to think I was plagiarizing ideas.
  10. bbgun

    bbgun Benched

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    That's the qualifier people are overlooking. It's pretty clear that he wouldn't have either man heading up the party.
  11. ABQCOWBOY

    ABQCOWBOY Moderator Staff Member

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    I respect Colin Powell very much but he is no longer a part of the Republican Party. He's as much as said so himself. How can he be considered as a prospective leader of the GOP when he doesn't consider himself to be a part of the GOP?
  12. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    Powell is making plenty on his speaking tours. Your idea of a team player is strange to say the least. Powell claims he is a moderate republican so when the party ran out a moderate you would think Powell would be a good team player, right? Well we know what Powell did. He sold out or came out of the closet or whatever you want to call it, but he definitely screwed the moderates in the republican party. I guess your definition of team player would be to stab your teammates in the back.
  13. Jordan55

    Jordan55 Active Member

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    I'm surprised he didn't make the jump with the old left leaning Rino from Pennsylvania. while I appreciate and respect Powell's service to our country, he no longer holds any creditability in the Republican party.
    Hopefully the Dems welcome him as good as they have Arlen.
    Back to the Principles!! of the conservative party
  14. Temo

    Temo Active Member

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    This isn't really earth-shaking news. It's hardly news at all.
  15. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Yep but IF I had to choose I would choose someone that could do the job and would be willing to do the job. I don't think Rush would want to and I don't know if he could because of the way he goes about things for shock value.
  16. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    You mean telling the truth? Admitting to making a mistake he regrets...heaven forbid we have someone with integrity vs someone who just wants to shock people for ratings.
  17. TheCount

    TheCount Pixel Pusher

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    Powell has never been a "text book" republican and has always been a moderate when it comes to military matters. I think it's fair to say he was very put-off by some of the decisions Bush made and has tried to distance himself from that.

    I mean the fact that he's pro-choice alone is enough to put off most hard-line republicans, and he didn't support McCain for several reasons although he had supported him in past efforts, not the least being the appointment of Palin.

    Being that around here any vaguely progressive statement or disagreements with conservative talking points get you labeled a Liberal, I'm not surprised Powell is now considered to no longer be Republican by some, not in the slightest and to think Cheyney would ever support Powell is ridiculous.

    I'd imagine many republican's felt betrayed by his support for Obama, but up until that point Powell had taken many stances that were contrary to the party line.
  18. ABQCOWBOY

    ABQCOWBOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Your correct about Powell's historic stances. In fact, that more then anything IMO, is what held him back in the eyes of the GOP.

    Never the less, the truth of the matter is that Republicans, IMO, will not follow him regardless. Temo is more correct then anybody IMO. This is a none issue. Republicans won't follow him so to present him as a leader of the GOP is like saying, "Lets get the band back together" when John and George are no longer amoung the living.

    NC. No Chance.
  19. arglebargle

    arglebargle Well-Known Member

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    I think when some of you go, 'We ran the moderate and he failed!', you are making a mistaken assumption. He failed because he was too tightly tied to the previous administrations failures. Even though he was never particularly a party stalwart. He had to run in the Republican primaries and provided all sorts of wonderful 'I am with the Prez 100%' moments for later use by the Dems. And nominating Palin completely destroyed any chance to attack Obama as inexperianced.

    Anyway, Colin Powell has already shown that he has what it takes to be a very competant leader. I know I would most likely have voted for him, no matter which party he ran for.
  20. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    Powell admitted to regretting his support for Obama? Good for him. I knew those who believed Powell was in the bag for Obama because he is black was crazy talk. I must have missed it. Do you have a link?

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