1. Welcome to CowboysZone!  Join us!  Come on!  You know you want to!

Complete Civil War submarine unveiled for first time

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by BrAinPaiNt, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

    60,437 Messages
    3,677 Likes Received
    LINK TO ARTICLE

    NORTH CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) - Confederate Civil War vessel H.L. Hunley, the world's first successful combat submarine when it sank a Union ship in 1864, was unveiled in full and unobstructed for the first time on Thursday, capping a decade of careful preservation.

    "No one alive has ever seen the Hunley complete. We're going to see it today," said engineer John King as a crane at a Charleston conservation laboratory slowly lifted a massive steel truss covering the top of the submarine.

    There is a picture if you follow the link.
  2. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

    28,177 Messages
    1,212 Likes Received
    oh wow. this is cool! i saw this once on the history channel and it was pretty amazing. i think there was a later submarine, or maybe even the very first sub uncovered in south america w/not much left.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,412287,00.html

    For the past 137 years, a mysterious wreck has emerged at low tide each day on a beach off the coast of Panama. Researchers now know that it's the presumed lost "Sub Marine Explorer," one of the world's first submarines and a vessel that would ultimately kill its German inventor.
  3. Hostile

    Hostile Peace Zone Supporter

    118,492 Messages
    1,756 Likes Received
    Stuff like this just awes me. On Monday, a friend who works at the Pima Air Museum here in Tucson took another friend and I on a guided tour of the SR71 Blackbird and the WWII Museums. He is a Korean War vet who was in Bulgaria as a child when it was being bombed. He told us stories, shared real History of the planes there, and generally kept us enthralled for 4 hours.

    Seeing this sub live would probably give me chills. Can you imagine those first submariners? They had to wonder if the thing would work or not. Truly an amazing feat given the time period of the Civil War. Think about it folks, no gas or diesel engines at that time. Coal and steam.
  4. Hostile

    Hostile Peace Zone Supporter

    118,492 Messages
    1,756 Likes Received
    Holy crap that's cool too.
  5. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Staff Member

    31,718 Messages
    2,487 Likes Received
    That is very cool.

    Thanks for posting it Brain.
  6. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

    28,177 Messages
    1,212 Likes Received
    did you look at the photo gallery?
  7. Hostile

    Hostile Peace Zone Supporter

    118,492 Messages
    1,756 Likes Received
    Yeah, I still am.
  8. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

    6,276 Messages
    1,275 Likes Received
    I love Civil War History . This is amazing . Thanks for posting . I will add a trip to see the Hunley to my bucket list .
  9. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

    28,177 Messages
    1,212 Likes Received
    pretty amazing story, isn't it? also the 1st signs of decompression sickness, or the bends.
  10. Joe Rod

    Joe Rod When Keeping it Real Goes Wrong

    8,382 Messages
    534 Likes Received
    Well that certainly gives me a reason to head to Charleston this summer. Wow.
  11. ologan

    ologan Well-Known Member

    3,702 Messages
    195 Likes Received
    If you've never been to Charleston,you will enjoy the hell out of that town. Give yourself ample time to see the historical sights,as there are many. Also,if you get a chance to venture over to Mt. Pleasant,SC (Across the river),go to "The Wreck of the Richard and Charlene"...Some of the best seafood going around there. Most tourists go to "Hyman's Seafood"....locals go to "The Wreck"!
  12. Jammer

    Jammer Retired Air Force Guy Zone Supporter

    2,845 Messages
    83 Likes Received
    I live 5-10 minutes away from where the Hunley is. I still haven't made time to go see it. I've been to Charleston's historic spots like Ft. Sumter only because I had to do some work there. I've been to other cities' historic spots more than I've been to my own town of Charleston. Go figure.
  13. Hoofbite

    Hoofbite Well-Known Member

    32,421 Messages
    2,123 Likes Received
    I'm not even sure they were using steam.

    Picture 4 looks like it has a giant crank shaft running right down the middle that would be powered by hand.

    You gotta have stones of steel to get in that thing.
  14. Jammer

    Jammer Retired Air Force Guy Zone Supporter

    2,845 Messages
    83 Likes Received
    I will agree about Hyman's Seafood. Overrated and overpriced. There are way more local seafood places to go to than Hyman's.
  15. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

    12,749 Messages
    234 Likes Received
    They weren't using steam. It said it was a hand-cranked propellor in the article.

    The narrow, top-secret "torpedo fish," built in Mobile, Alabama by Horace Hunley from cast iron and wrought iron with a hand-cranked propeller, arrived in Charleston in 1863 while the city was under siege by Union troops and ships.
  16. Romo2Bryant4Six

    Romo2Bryant4Six Member

    692 Messages
    0 Likes Received
    Thanks for the post. I'm a big history nerd so it was a great story
  17. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

    28,177 Messages
    1,212 Likes Received
    can you imagine being 19 in 1863 and you say "you want me to get into what???"
  18. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

    6,276 Messages
    1,275 Likes Received
    I'm 44 and it is 2012 and I wouldn't get in a modern sub .:D
  19. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

    8,124 Messages
    0 Likes Received
    I read a piece on the Hunley years ago for a paper I was writing in college. It actually killed a few crews when they were testing the design. 3 total, IIRC. One crew got stuck in the mud, and suffocated on the first time they submerged. The second died in a test attack on a dummy target. The third after the attack on the Union blockade.

    They had no problems finding crews for each of the first two times they lost the crew. Supposedly they had a huge volunteer list.

    Scary thing, how they figured out how long they could stay submerged based on the air inside the vessel after an attack if they had to wait it out?

    They submerged. Only light in the sub is a candle. Candle goes out from lack of oxygen. And then it was a test to see how long the men could stand the carbon dioxide build-up before someone said something and they surfaced. The first real test of it, the candle didn't make it 1/4 of the time as they stayed down. Someone finally says something, and they all agree they've been down too long.

    Memory being what it is, Dad might have bought me a book in middle school on famous ship wrecks and lost ships that included military war records and diaries from sailors and/or observers of the ship wrecks. I know it had a really long piece on the four men who served on the HMS Hood and were transferred off just before she went out after the Bismark.
  20. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

    12,749 Messages
    234 Likes Received
    Yes, sir. Think about rotating the guys in and out, cranking the propellor. I'm surprised the thing even worked.

Share This Page