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DeCastro at center ?

Discussion in 'Draft Zone' started by jnday, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    I was thumbing through some draft info and ran across some info that stated DeCastro played center in his earlier days . Have any of you guys seen any reports that confirms this . I forgot the link . It's no secret that I have wanted DeCastro as early as midseason . If he has center skills , this makes the case for him as the pick at14 a lock if he is available IMO . That is assuming that he is available at the 14th pick . For the doubters , does this change any opinions ?
  2. Deep_Freeze

    Deep_Freeze Well-Known Member

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    Actually it does increase his value, I love versatility in draft picks. A great center is hard to find, and if he could hold down that spot and we drafted him, I would rather see him at center cause its by far our weakest position pre-free agency.

    Steve Hutchinson went 17th as a guard, was the best in the league for years, and still hasn't won anything. If you pick a guard that high, there better be no doubt about him being great.
  3. Dmoore Esq

    Dmoore Esq Member

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    Eh, I say OG is a more important position than center. You can find an okay one cheaply. Versatility is nice, but I don't think whether he can play center or not is going to change my opinion on him. If he could swing out to tackle in a pinch, it would. That's why Glenn really interests me.
  4. TheCount

    TheCount Pixel Pusher

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    I think he's a guard, but I tend to agree that being able to play center would make him more valuable.
  5. dallasfaniac

    dallasfaniac Active Member

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    If it turned out he could run a 4.3 40, would that change anyone's opinions?
  6. ABQcowboyJR

    ABQcowboyJR Well-Known Member

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    Makes him much more valuable. I tend to doubt he could play center in the NFL though. The question marks about his game would not lend themselves well to playing center. Center has to fight off big tackles with one hand initially. Just something to think about.
  7. TheCount

    TheCount Pixel Pusher

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    What center blocks a guy with one hand? If you're a center, and your snap is so slow that you're blocking a guy with one arm, you are not in the NFL.

    I've never seen a center so slow that the defender is in his chest before he can even bring his hands up, that's awful technique. Especially considering a defender can't even line up over the center.
  8. ABQcowboyJR

    ABQcowboyJR Well-Known Member

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    So your saying that having to snap the ball has absolutely no impact on blocking?
  9. TheCount

    TheCount Pixel Pusher

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    Nope, I'm saying no center blocks with one arm. There's a reason defenders aren't allowed to line up over the center.
  10. dallasfaniac

    dallasfaniac Active Member

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    For the most part I agree with TheCount. First off, the center knows when the ball is going to be snapped so he gets a head start. Second, there is some distance involved here between where the DT lines up and where the center's chest is after snap. However, Ratliff used to be so fast off the snap he didn't need to use a rip move, he could hit the shoulder and penetrate the gap between center and guard with ease, forcing an almost constant double-team.
  11. ABQcowboyJR

    ABQcowboyJR Well-Known Member

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    Like I said, you initially must block with one arm. I don't think it really matters though. DeCastro will start RG just about anywhere he goes.
  12. dallasfaniac

    dallasfaniac Active Member

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    Are you referring solely to punt/kick formations?
  13. CowboyHawg2012

    CowboyHawg2012 New Member

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    DeCastro is a guard, no putting him elsewhere. What i am intrigued about now is can we target someone later to help the center position. Im kinda becoming a big fan of David Molk from Michigan. He had turmoil throughout his career but really played well this past year under Hoke. faced some pretty stout defenses, yet still managed to open up holes for Shoelace to run. Hoke runs a pro style offense, and he only had 1 year in it, its still better tha guys coming strictly from the spread. He could be 4/5 ruonder
  14. CowboyHawg2012

    CowboyHawg2012 New Member

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    Plus, he just did 41 reps at the combine..... weighed in at under 300 (298) but he's got the athletiscism that we need. would really love to see him and DeCastro together in this draft class, or some 2 out of DeCastro, Zeitler, Konz, Molk, Brewster, Blake
  15. mortboy

    mortboy Active Member

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    I was listening to NFL radio the other day and they were talking about the differences between RG and LG. I found this that pretty much sums up what they were saying. Thought it was interesting so I wanted to share.

    RIGHT GUARD

    Without question the most difficult of the interior line positions, right guards are most likely to be left one-on-one with an elite inside rusher. The predominance of teams to slide their center to the left to protect the quarterback's blind side creates a greater value for the right guard position. Fourteen-year veteran Todd Steussie, currently available on the free agent market, says, "Right guard is definitely harder than left guard." Recently-retired lineman Todd Fordham, a 10-year NFL vet, agreed: "The left guard always has help."

    Though the difference in value between the two guard spots is lessened somewhat in an offense that rarely slides the pass protections like the Colts, the strength of the formation often dictates that the right guard has the wider alignment, and thus more difficult assignment, on his side.

    LEFT GUARD
    Because the left guard position is generally less difficult than the right guard position, I have been consistently perplexed the last couple of seasons by the amount of money teams are investing in the position.

    Steve Hutchinson, Kris Dielman, Eric Steinbach, Derrick Dockery and Faneca lead the parade of left guards that have received contracts in excess of $40 million. Though I am not sure either guard position is worth that much of the salary cap, I would be much more willing to pay those dollars to a right guard given the greater difficulty in his assignment. I think the Browns got a relative steal by signing right guard Rex Hadnot to a two-year, $7 million deal this offseason.

    The greatest reason why left guards are cashing in these days? There are two: 1) The grading system for offensive linemen; and 2) General lack of understanding among some NFL personnel people concerning the difficulty inherent with the different positions.

    All of these players are considered upper echelon and likely grade out among the highest linemen on their respective teams. Part of that is because they are good players, but a lot of it has to do with the fact they are much more likely to receive help from the center and thus less likely to create a negative play. The formula is simple: Less one-on-ones against defensive linemen means less chances to give up a sack or pressure. Their consistently high performance given the lower risk at the position tricks many personnel people to assume they are worthy of that money. I disagree. I believe they are all outstanding players but think they would have a tougher time if they played right guard.

    There is a reason why most of the interior guys getting paid the big money are left guards and not right guards and the sooner teams can figure it out, the sooner they can begin to allocate more of their money to a position that creates a greater value proposition.
  16. ABQcowboyJR

    ABQcowboyJR Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna trust the dollars here. LG is more valuable to the team in every aspect IMO.
  17. dallasfaniac

    dallasfaniac Active Member

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    I don't buy it myself. First, the RG gets bailed out all the time because the QB sees the pressure coming unlike blindside hits the LG have to prevent. Second, they generally put TEs to the right side, allowing the OT to help out the RG.
  18. cowboy_ron

    cowboy_ron You Can't Fix Stupid

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    The Colts may take him at 1 instead if Luck then:lmao2:
  19. burmafrd

    burmafrd Well-Known Member

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    be interested in what question marks there are and who claims to see them since every national site does not mention any.
  20. RoyTheHammer

    RoyTheHammer Well-Known Member

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    Center is not by far our weakest position right now. OG is by a landslide. Kowalski or Nagy would make a solid choice at center next year. We don't have even an average OG on the team right now.

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