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Disobedience of the Scientific Method is going to kill the NFL

Discussion in 'Fan Zone' started by erod, Oct 10, 2013.

  1. erod

    erod Well-Known Member

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    Leigh Steinberg, Troy Aikman's agent, recounted his time with Troy in the hospital after he was concussed in the NFC Championship game in '93. "What are we doing here?" Troy asked, then was told by Steinberg of the days events. "Did we win?" Yep, and the two celebrated.

    "What are we doing here?" Troy asked again, several minutes later. It wasn't the last time Troy asked Steinberg that same question the rest of the day. To this day, Troy has no memory of that game whatsoever.

    Seven days later, Troy played in the Super Bowl.

    For those that saw the PBS special, "A League in Denial", you watched another nail, perhaps several nails, get driven into the coffin of the NFL. The game won't exist at all soon, at least in any recognizable form. Troy believes that, and I do, too.

    A Harvard study insists that football players of all ages are scarring their brains, called CTE, making for what will be a potentially miserable life down the road, perhaps one that will even lead to drug addiction, family abandonment, and even suicide. Dave Duerson, Junior Seau, Mike Webster....the stories keep rolling in.

    No doubt the NFL rushed to settle the lawsuit with the former players before the airing of this documentary, which likened the NFL to the tabacco industry.

    However, as sure as I am of the impending demise of the NFL, I'm also sure this "science" is being ramrodded down our throats long before real conclusions can be made. Much like global warming or global cooling or whatever is going on, scientists nowdays seem so determined to prove the outcome they want to be, rather than the truth of what actually is, based on outside pressures to do so.

    Aikman pointed out that he's been through numerous tests since, and all have come out "excellent", with no signs of resulting damage. He also mentioned that many scientists claim that there is actually no proof of the existence of CTE. Much study needs to be done, although the Harvard scientists seem to want so badly for their research (and no doubt, the money that will follow) to be absolutely true.

    Some questions that need to be asked, but aren't: What percentage of players actually have "CTE" versus the typical person? What role does PEDs, drugs, or other lifestyle choices have in health of these players later on? Why are so many players seemingly unaffected? Does CTE lead to dementia for certain? Is it even proven to be related?

    Regardless of the answers to those questions, the implications are already in fast action.
    The NFL is changing their rules like underwear. Equipment is almost sure to drastically change soon. Fines for hits to the head, and precautions taken after one, are rising rapidly to keep up with the public relations whirlwind.

    Perhaps more alarming to the NFL, people are pulling their kids out of football in large numbers and sending them to the soccer fields. Hysteria has set in, despite the large number of dads that played football through high school and perhaps college that are relatively just fine after the fact.

    It's only going to take one - just one - successful lawsuit against a high school, a college, or a professional team. The house of cards will come crashing down, and football as we know it, will be over.

    There will be no Peyton Mannings and Tony Romos. Kids from those kinds of families will send their sons in a different direction altogether. It'll be a sport left for the same athletes drawn to MMA or boxing.

    My problem is that these enormous conclusions are being drawn from so little evidence and early research. Only a relative handful of brains have been studied, and the actual cause of brain damage, or the uniqueness of it compared to the general population, has not been accounted for. Yet, these early findings are being cited as absolute fact to serve the purpose of a lawsuit and a research group that seems bias toward a conclusion not yet proven.

    Either way, the mob effect is well under way. Can't put toothpaste back in the tube.

    Enjoy these final seasons of the NFL. There aren't many left.
    Rack Bauer likes this.
  2. visionary

    visionary Well-Known Member

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    I like most of your posts but i would strongly recommend staying away from medical stuff if you are a non-medical person

    CTE is very real and is here to stay
    If CTE were not more real than most people know, the NFL would not have "rushed to settle" as you say, and would not be changing rules "like underwear"

    There is a reason my sons will never play football (at least if I can help it)

    JMO
  3. 17yearsandcounting

    17yearsandcounting Benched

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    Have you ever even gotten a concussion bro?
    mcompact likes this.
  4. tomduhain

    tomduhain Member

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  5. erod

    erod Well-Known Member

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    I didn't say it. Troy said his doctors said it.
  6. visionary

    visionary Well-Known Member

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    Like I said JMO
  7. tomduhain

    tomduhain Member

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    Saw "A League in Denial". It was powerful. However, the NFL sky will not collapse but it will change by necessity.

    I suspect that, the scientific debate aside, most people already accept and believe that football head trauma is serious and with long-term medical consequences likely for some or many players. What's needed is reformed techniques to discourage head down tackles and better helmet technology. We have the capability to engineer a reduction in the danger but not eliminate risk. That will always be part of the game. If we want players to give and take "big hits" for our entertainment (and it IS entertaining) the league and it's fans should be prepared to accept and pay for the consequences.
  8. 65fastback2plus2

    65fastback2plus2 Well-Known Member

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    look...I dont see boxers or mma fighters or bull riders or a host of other sports people complaining about brain injuries. they got in the sport and knew the consequences.

    nfl players need to quit complaining or quit the sport. one of the two.
    Fletch and djmajestik like this.
  9. 65fastback2plus2

    65fastback2plus2 Well-Known Member

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    I have...still have the scar you can see if my hair is short enough. Still remember how it happened and everything.
  10. burmafrd

    burmafrd Well-Known Member

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    Just how many NFL players have been identified to be having problems that are part of this? No one seems to know. Sure we have heard of the cases that are getting publicity but what are the numbers?

    I am becoming of the opinion that this has been blown out of proportion. That only a small number of players will suffer from this. Not large numbers as the players and their lawyers seem to b e saying without proving anything.
    djmajestik likes this.
  11. erod

    erod Well-Known Member

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    What if the talent pool does up because school districts and colleges ban out after a successful lawsuit?

    Aikman said he wouldn't let his son play football of he had one. Same for tons of former players.
  12. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    The league will adapt. The NFL is too lucrative for it not to.
    Fletch, Future and Common Sense like this.
  13. ScipioCowboy

    ScipioCowboy More than meets the eye. Zone Supporter

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    Leave science to the scientists. If you're not a scientist, you shouldn't challenge a premise on scientific grounds.

    Now, you're free to argue that science is incapable of providing a complete answer to a problem, but that isn't the case here.
  14. Zimmy Lives

    Zimmy Lives Well-Known Member

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    In all the years of playing football (4th grade through college) I never suffered a concussion as defined by today's guidelines. Interestingly enough, the two concussions that I did suffer came playing soccer.

    I think that concussions can be avoided but everyone involved has to make a conscious effort to play using the right techniques and intentionally avoid blows to the head.
  15. 17yearsandcounting

    17yearsandcounting Benched

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    I got one my junior year of football. was playing guard and had to go straight ahead at the linebacker. Massive facemask on facemask collision. I wasnt mentally right for months afterwards, it seemed pretty obvious to me then that playing football was detrimental to my health.
  16. Future

    Future Intramural Legend

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    I think the league is working very hard to make that happen.

    I dont buy anything about the league caring about concussions or even about paying medical expenses in the future. Maybe I'm overly pessimistic, but I believe that 100% of the safety precautions being taken are geared towards keeping high profile players on the field, catering to the fantasy crowd who really has no care for how the game is supposed to be played, and selling more jerseys. Players are disposable and always will be, the league could care less if these guys get hurt.
    Smith22 likes this.
  17. Future

    Future Intramural Legend

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    Its growing despite the fact that it is getting watered down, which is a shame if you ask me.. 10 years from now the league won't look the same, and I can see a lot of fans abandoning it. But there will also be new ones who like the whole spread out offense only product that will be on the field.
    djmajestik likes this.
  18. Carharris2

    Carharris2 Well-Known Member

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    Yes. People should not jump to drastic conclusions based on limited sample sizes. I agree.
  19. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    The jury is still out on what it will morph into. And there's still the question of how high school and college football fits in.
  20. AbeBeta

    AbeBeta Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes -- back with the "scientists and their agendas" crap -- and here I thought the political board was dead.

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