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DMN: Archer: The mystique of the 40-yard dash

Discussion in 'Draft Zone' started by Cbz40, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. TOOMBS

    TOOMBS Member

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    I think Jack's argument is much more convincing since it is based around philosophies from experts in track, but you are probably right since you made a statement without backing it up and used the word "period" after it.
  2. Rack Bauer

    Rack Bauer Federal Agent

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    He didn't use anything to back up his statements. All he did was post that it is possible to improve your speed. No kidding, I already said that. But you can't make a slow person fast. That's the whole point, Chico.
  3. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    There's were you are perpetuating a lie...Skippy.

    I've asked you to point out where I said that...you can't. It's easier to take the play stupid route I guess.

    I said teach someone to become faster....and even though you short circuited that out of my quote...it's all up there exactly how I said it..and not how you edited it.

    And no, you never already said anything....just puff up your chest and talk really loud as you hammer the keyboard.....PERIOD!!!!!
  4. Cowboys&Caps

    Cowboys&Caps New Member

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    "1.55 seconds after 10 yards and finished with a 4.35-second 40. Impressive for any receiver but more so because he weighed 239 pounds."

    Oh my Goodness think about that it took him 1.55 seconds to do 1/4 of the 40 putting him above the 6.0 second pace, but his recovery speed is absolutly amazing. It was clear that he got a bad start on his 4.35 run.
  5. Rack Bauer

    Rack Bauer Federal Agent

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    So can you TEACH speed to a slow person or not? I already pointed out that speed can be IMPROVED, but you can't teach speed to someone that doesn't already have some SPEED.
  6. Hoofbite

    Hoofbite Well-Known Member

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    You have been saying that and thats true. You can teach someone to be faster. Just like a proper technique in weight lifting could mean that a guys max go up another 10 LBs. Hell, you can teach someone to look through the bible, searching for clues to the future and past through Biblic code (Even thought its complete BS, it can be taught.) . You can teach people anything.

    With that being said, here is what you also said at the start of this thread that prompted my reponse.

    After that, you moved to your whole "teaching to be better" aspect which is true because you can teach people to do anything. So, as far as teaching someone to do something......YES, it can be done.

    But heres the thing. When analysts and such refer to "teaching speed" they don't mean straight line speed exclusively. There are referring to natural ability, not potential ability. They aren't sitting there proclaiming that someone cannot improve their performance through training, they are saying that when someone has "It", they have it because they were born with it.
  7. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    http://www.runwashington.com/features/trainlegsgofaster.html

    Running Tips
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica]February 1, 2000[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica]For the Washington Running Report[/FONT]


    [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]FACT: As a runner gets faster, the stride length shortens. Of course, this means that the secret to running faster is to turn the legs over faster - to teach them to move to a faster cadence. Research continues to show that a shorter stride is more efficient, and that when runners err, they tend to over-stride. In my experience, the shortening of only an inch or less can often relax the hamstring and other muscles; a resilient muscle can respond quicker, enabling the legs to go through the motion quicker. Most of you will run faster - with less effort.[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]The Workout [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]
    Do a series of one minute accelerations. At first only 3-4. Gradually build up to 8-12. Don't try to spring. Running all- out often causes injury. In the more gradual acceleration, you're teaching yourself how to run faster - without significantly increasing effort. On each of these, count as you did in the warm-up for the full minute - as one of your feet touches.
    Don't let this become a gut-wrenching, speed workout. You're teaching yourself to glide at a quicker pace. This allows you to run faster with less effort - and decreased chance of injury.[/FONT]

    http://www.specialolympics.org/Spec...s/Teaching Athletics Event Skills/Sprints.htm


    [IMG][IMG][IMG] Print this page The Sprints (100M-400M)

    Sprinting is fun. Sprinting is the art of running fast. The object is to run as fast as possible while starting from being as still as possible. Power and coordination are the essential ingredients in the production of speed. Coordination can be improved through practicing good running mechanics. Speed is mostly an inherent factor; however, both coordination and speed can be improved through proper training. Even though sprinting involves all-out effort, pacing oneself in order to evenly distribute the expenditure of energy is essential. Sprinting can be broken down into four phases: the start, acceleration, maintaining momentum, and the finish.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/health_and_fitness/4286146.stm







    Mike Antoniades
    Speed, conditioning & rehabilitation coach
    [IMG]


    Whether you run to keep fit, compete at the Olympics or participate at any level in a multidirectional ball sport you can always improve your running and sprinting technique.

    Running well and running fast is a skill, not something you were born with. And just like any other skill it can be taught.

    Are you running efficiently?


    Some of the most obvious weaknesses I see in runners and joggers are:
    1. Bouncing up and down too much
    2. Over striding
    3. Not using their hamstrings enough
    4. Landing on feet too heavily
    5. Breaking action on landing
    6. Not using arms
    7. Twist midriff side to side while running
    8. The head and upper body are bent forward
    9. Jogging slower than you could walk!



    Most joggers and runners are biomechanically inefficient because their running technique is poor.
    They don't use the necessary body parts efficiently so when they are supposed to be enjoying themselves they are instead suffering pain.

    THE SCIENCE


    So how can you run faster, more efficiently and avoid injury?
    The nervous, muscular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems of our body are all involved when we run.


    They all combine to create the neuromuscular and neuromechanical systems.

    We can improve the biomechanical movements for runners by teaching the body and the mind the correct motor patterns.

    When you want to change a movement in your body it needs to be stored in your muscle memory so you can repeat without thinking, particularly when you are tired.

    When you perform a motion the body sends messages to the brain in a certain sequence.

    To create a permanent map in your brain and nervous system you need to repeat this motion many times until it is ingrained in your muscles and your brain.


    http://www.armystudyguide.com/conte...prep_articles/learn-to-run-faster-now-6.shtml

    Learn To Run Faster Now: 6 Quick Fixes



    Posted Thursday, October 6, 2005

    Contributed by: SGT Michael Volkin, author of The Ultimate Basic Training Guidebook
    This is the second in a series about preparing for Boot Camp. Read the first article: "Prepare for Bootcamp."​

    Most Soldiers will tell you that running is the hardest portion of the physical fitness sessions in basic training. In basic training, everywhere you go, you will be in a hurry. Every other day, your morning physical training sessions will consist of a long run that only gets longer as the 9 weeks pass.​

    Running seems to be a natural movement to humans, which is why almost nobody bothers to learn how to run effectively. However, if you can apply a few simple techniques to your running style, the efficiency of your body movement can increase dramatically.













    [IMG]


  8. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    You can teach a slow person to run faster.
  9. Rack Bauer

    Rack Bauer Federal Agent

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    Duh. You know dang well what I meant. You're the one that changed your argument from what you posted at the beginning.


    FastER? yes. But you can't teach a slow person to be FAST.
  10. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    And I'm sticking to it. Teaching speed is teaching someone to be faster.
  11. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    I didn't change anything...I only said 'the myth of 'you can't teach speed.'

    And you had a heart attack.

    Perhaps it's you dang well knew what I meant....and just chose to go off the deep end with it.

    Because I never said "you could teach a slow person to be fast." And you STILL can't point to where I did.
  12. Hoofbite

    Hoofbite Well-Known Member

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    Okay, but in the context that it is used by an analyst, when they say you "can't teach speed", you know what they mean. You know what they are referring to.

    So in that definition of the phrase, can you teach speed?
  13. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    You want to stick to context do you? Well, in your effort to rehash my 'original' intent, you offered up my initial quote:

    But alas, as your brother in arms Rack did in a previous post, you short circuited the entire post, which went just like this:

    http://cowboyszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1425499&postcount=3

    Which I followed up with this:

    So indeed, the post CLEARLY is a response to Brian Urlacher's lowering of his 40 time in 3 months of work with Smith, a paid speed coach, by 10ths of a second. And just what did that speed coach do? Yes, that's right...help teach Urlacher how to lower his time by 10ths of a second.

    Nothing there stating making a 'slow' person 'fast'. A comment on one players admission of lowering his speed through the aid of a speed coach.

    Anything beyond the original intent was produced by the both of you.
  14. Hoofbite

    Hoofbite Well-Known Member

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    I offered your initial response because you quoted "you can't teach speed" and labeled it a myth.

    You saying it in response to the Urlacher article part means nothing. Its the fact that you quoted the phrase and labeled it a myth. You were directly saying that something people believe is false. In this case, that something is "teaching speed" and the people are analysts and such who say that EXACT phrase when referring to players.

    So, again I ask. In the context it is used by analysts and scouts, can you teach speed?

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