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Iran was integral in stopping attacks in Basra

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by Jon88, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. Jon88

    Jon88 Benched

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    BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN)

    Iran was integral in persuading Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to halt attacks by his militia on Iraqi security forces, an Iraqi lawmaker said Monday.

    Haidar al-Abadi, who is with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's Dawa Party, said Iraqi Shiite lawmakers traveled Friday to Iran to meet with al-Sadr. They returned Sunday, the day al-Sadr told his Mehdi Army fighters to stand down.

    News of Iran's involvement in the cease-fire talks came as an al-Maliki spokesman said operations targeting "outlaws" in the Shiite stronghold of Basra would end when the mission's goals were achieved. Earlier, al-Maliki spokesman Sami al-Askari said the operation would be over by week's end, but he later recanted on the timetable.

    The lawmakers who traveled to Iran to broker the cease-fire were from five Shiite parties, including the Sadrist movement. Al-Abadi would not say where in Iran the meeting was held.

    The lawmakers hoped to convince Iran to cut off aid to Shiite militias and to persuade al-Sadr to end the fighting. Negotiations were difficult, but the delegation achieved its aims, al-Abadi said. Watch how the cease-fire affects Shiite vs. Shiite fights ยป

    News of the delegation's role comes a day after Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh firmly denied there had been any direct or indirect talks between the government and al-Sadr's representatives in Najaf, where al-Sadr's headquarters is located.


    Al-Dabbagh made no mention of the Iran meeting but said the government welcomes efforts by politicians to end the bloodshed in Iraq.

    Iran's exact involvement in the negotiations is unclear, but two sources concur that the Islamic republic played a key role.

    While al-Abadi said Iranian officials participated in the discussions, another source close to the talks said the Iranians pressured al-Sadr to craft an agreement.

    Al-Sadr and some Shiite parties have close ties to Iran, a Shiite-dominated country. The talks were the latest reflection of the influence Iran wields in Iraq, where about 60 percent of the population is Shiite.

    As for the operations targeting outlaws in Basra, Maj. Gen. Abdul Aziz Mohammed, commander of operations for Iraq's Ministry of Defense, told reporters at a news conference that he hoped the mission would be brief and limited. He provided no timetable.

    More than 400 people have died since early last week in battles across the war-ravaged country, according to sources.

    At least 200 people have been killed and 500 wounded in Basra battles since Tuesday, a high-ranking Iraqi security official said. More than 100 had been killed in Baghdad as of Sunday, with another 100-plus killed in clashes in other cities in southern Iraq, Iraqi authorities said.

    The mood Monday on the streets in Basra was quiet, said al-Askari, the prime minister's spokesman. Shops opened in the morning, and the movement of people was almost back to normal in the center of town.

    Troops and police, whom the U.S. and Britain have backed, are in control of much of Basra, and local security forces are going house-to-house in some districts to confiscate weapons and chase "the outlaws and the criminal and smuggling gangs," the spokesman said.

    The Shiite militia members that were in the streets have withdrawn, al-Askari said.

    There had been an all-day curfew in Basra during the operation. It was lifted Saturday, and the normal curfew of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. is in place.

    The fighting in Basra spread to other southern cities, such as Kut, Karbala and Diwaniya, and it raged in Shiite regions of Baghdad.

    Authorities in Baghdad also reported a quieter situation in the capital, where there have been no reports of clashes, an Iraqi Interior Ministry official said.

    There were several instances of "indirect fire" at the area commonly known as the Green Zone, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said, but there were no reports of deaths or injuries. Indirect fire is a reference to rocket and mortar fire, and the U.S. military suspects that hard-line Shiite militants stage such attacks.

    Authorities in Baghdad eased a stiff, citywide curfew on Monday, but a vehicle ban remained in place in Sadr City, Shula and Kadhimiya -- three neighborhoods seen as al-Sadr strongholds. The usual 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew is in place citywide.

    Mohammed, the Iraqi commander, also said the situation was quiet in other southern cities where fighting had been reported.

    In issuing his call to end fighting, al-Sadr demanded that the Iraqi government provide amnesty to his followers and release any supporters who were being held.

    Al-Sadr suspended the operations of the Mehdi Army in August, and the cease-fire is credited with helping decrease the violence in Iraq over the last few months.


    U.S. and Iraqi troops have continued to target Shiite militants who ignored the cease-fire, and the al-Sadr movement had complained before this upsurge in fighting that it was being unfairly targeted.

    U.S. and British forces have supported Iraqi troops with airstrikes and shelling in Basra as well as reconnaissance and intelligence, military officials with the U.S.-led coalition have said. U.S. troops also have conducted raids and engaged in gunbattles with militia fighters alongside Iraqi troops.

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  2. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Iran fears the freedom that is growing in Iraq.
  3. Jon88

    Jon88 Benched

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    What makes you say that? I think they did it so the militia will live to fight another day.
  4. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    that's my thought. losing, so stop from a position of choice/power so not to lose face.
  5. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Im sure those 400 people killed last week were also grateful for that newfound freedom.
    :bow: :bow:
  6. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    what about the hundreds of thousands alive and having that freedom because of that sacrafice?

    every story has 2 sides, dude. this "machine" stance some people take is just beyond me.
  7. Jon88

    Jon88 Benched

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    Of the 400 people I'm wondering how many were in a militia and how many were in the Iraqi Army?
  8. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    when you've got one number and a big agenda, you don't normally dive too deep into the facts. you just drop cherry-bombs and run away feeling smug.
  9. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Your right I need to be more positive.

    http://www.theonion.com/content/node/30610
  10. vta

    vta The Proletariat

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    Probably not, but the Sunni who were suspicious of the majority Shia Government, now have some reconciliation in seeing that denominational concerns might be out the window, with lawless Shia tribes being targeted, by that Shia government.

    The rule of law over religious favoritism/fanaticism.
  11. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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  12. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Backwoods Sexy Staff Member

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  13. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Yeah. Thats the point. Praising the "progress" made while ignoring the hundreds of people dying and thousands more suffering is a little silly but its not stopping proponents of this fiasco from doing it.
  14. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    no sillier than micro-managing a war on a minute by minute basis for no other reason than to show how wrong it is.
  15. Bizwah

    Bizwah Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, because suffering and dieing for freedom is silly.

    Just ask the 600,000 that died in the Civil War.

    Freedom comes at a price. A high one at that.
  16. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Backwoods Sexy Staff Member

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    Please stop with the silly comparisons.

    OUR civil war vs THEIR civil war.

    Geez what price our we paying for OUR freedom now.
  17. Bizwah

    Bizwah Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, a little hyperbole.

    But freedom does require sacrifice. I believe we're helping to preserve our freedom in Iraq. Proactively.

    I don't view it as silly at all. I'll never view our freedom as such. Or our sarcrifices.
  18. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    if one of the goals of mankind is to over time remove the barriers that keep us apart, war is war and you pick a side over right or wrong.

    not us or them.

    that's a far off and yes, lofty goal. but it's still how i tend to seperate things out. i think we'd all work to that goal with different levels of how we'd do it, how far we'd go and in a given instance.

    the french helped us. no one was dogging the french for helping us there. but, this wasn't their war.
  19. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Backwoods Sexy Staff Member

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    I just get a little tired of admins using Freedom and Patriotism as buzz words to sell things.

    We are not gaining freedom for us in any manner by fighting over there. We were not going to get flooded with terrorists over here after 9/11. Heck if we would have just kept our fighting contained in afghan we would still be just as protected in the US if not more since 9/11 because we would have more money, man power and resources to stay here and protect us.

    So...I get irked when I hear admins use that freedom line and even more irked when others use it because they sop it up with a biscuit.

    Plus the comparisons to older wars like the revolutionary war, the civil war, WWI or WWII just do not work with our current war at all.
  20. iceberg

    iceberg nothing is nothing Zone Supporter

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    that did make me wonder how many french died in the american revolution. can't find it anywhere but it has been asked a few times. doesn't seem well documented, but i did find this.

    List of Volunteers
    http://xenophongroup.com/mcjoynt/volunt.htm

    (The following list is partial and under development. There were at least 87 officers of the French Royal army that served in the the US Continental Army, and about four French army or naval officers served with John Paul Jones' naval squadron. The estimated number of French who served 'in the ranks' of the US forces is higher, but not well documented.)

    Kermorvan, Barazer de (1740-1817). Lieutenant Colonel, Engineer Corps, Continental Army.
    Chastellux, Chevalier de (1734-1788). A senior officer on Rochambeau's staff.
    Capitaine du Chesnoy, Michel (1746-1804). Major, Continental Army, aide-de- camp to Lafayette.
    Colomb, Pierre (1754-c.1817). Lieutenant, Captain in the Georgia Regiment, Continental Army.
    Du Bouchet, Denis-Jean Florimond de Langlois, marquis (1752-1826). Captain, then Major in the Continental Army, later joined Rochambeau's Army.
    Du Buysson des Aix [Hays] (1752-1786). Major, then Lieutenant Colonel, Continental Army. Brigadier General in North Carolina Militia.
    Du Ponceau, Pierre-Etienne (1760-1844). Captain, later Major, Continental Army, aide-de-camp and secretary to 'baron' von Steuben.
    Du Portail, Louis Le Bègue de Presle (1743-1802). Brigadier General (Major General after Yorktown), commanding the Engineer Corps, Continental Army.
    Fleury, François-Louis Teissèdre de (b.1749). Captain, Major, later Lieutenant Colonel, Continental Army; later joined Rochambeau's Army with Saintonge Regiment.
    La Fayette [Lafayette], marquis de (1757-1834). Major General, Continental Army.
    Landais, Pierre (1734-c.1820). Captain, Continental Navy, commanding the frigate Alliance.
    Maudit du Plessis, Thomas-Antoine, chevalier de (1753-1791). Captain of Artillery, Lieutenant Colonel, Continental Army; later in Rochambeau's Army as Senior Adjutant of the Artillery Park.
    Pontgibaud, Charles-Albert de Moré, comte de (1758-1837). aide-de-camp to Lafayette, Major, Continental Army.
    Preudhomme de Borre, chevalier de, (b.1717). Brigadier General, Continental Army.
    Tronson de Courdray, Philippe Charles Jean Baptiste (1738-1777). Major General, Continental Army.
    Tuffin, marquis de La Rouërie [dit 'Armand-Charles'] (1750-1793). Colonel of Continental Partisan Legion; Brigadier General, Continental Army, 1783. Known in America as 'Armand'.
    Vernier, Pierre-François (1736/7-1780). Major, Pulaski's Legion.
    Villefranche, Jean-Louis-Ambroise de Genton, chevalier de (1747-1784). Captain of Engineers, Major, later Colonel in the Continental Army.
    Gimat, Jean-Joseph Sourbader de (1743/4-?). Major, later Colonel of infantry, Continal Army.
    Gouvion, Jean Baptiste (1747-1792). Major, later Colonel, Engineer Corps, Continental Army.
    Laumoy, Jean Baptiste Joseph, chevalier de (1750-1832). Colonel, later Brigadier General, Engineer Corps, Continental Army.
    La Radière, Louis des Hayes de (?-?). French engineer who accompanied du Portail in joining the American engineer service. He was involved in the early design and consruction of fortifications at West Point, NY.
    Conway, Thomas (1733-1800?). Colonel, later Brigadier General, Continental Army.
    Colombe, Louis-Saint-Ange Morel de la (?-?). Accompanied Lafayette to America in 1777, and served as Lafayette's aide. He returned to France and then joined the French army, attached to a French regiment of dragoons as a captain on 4 March 1780. He returned to American with Rochambeau's expedition in 1780.
    L'Enfant, Pierre Charles (1754-1825). Lieutenant, and later Major in the Continental Army. A self-taught architect who drafted the first design for the city Washington in the Dictrict of Columbia.
    Kalb, Johann ['Baron de'] (1721-1780). Major General in the Continenal Army.
    Pommereuil de Martigny, Louis François de (?-?) Lieutenant of artillery in the American Army.

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