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Jimi Hendrix, 'People, Hell And Angels'

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by Doomsday101, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    Jimi Hendrix’s legend remains undiminished in the four decades since his death at 27. A pioneer in the history of music, his incendiary style forged a unique new hybrid of rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues, while his brilliant technique demonstrated how feedback, reverb and other sonic experimentation could expand his music’s palette into full, mind-blowing technicolor.

    But in 2013, does “People, Hell And Angels” reveal anything Hendrix fans haven’t already heard across various collections in all the years since? Yes — because this album of previously unreleased studio recordings from 1968-70 illuminates sides of Hendrix’s music as it was influenced by his growth as a songwriter, musician and producer, as well as the new players he jammed with.

    As he moved on from the blockbuster success he found with his band the Experience, Hendrix found kindred spirits in drummer Buddy Miles and bassist Billy Cox, who formed his new core group. Session men sometimes included Buffalo Springfield’s Stephen Stills, Mitch Mitchell, Lonnie Youngblood and others.



    Read more: http://magazine.foxnews.com/at-home...hell-and-angels?intcmp=HPBucket#ixzz2MhmjQlrq
  2. JIMMYBUFFETT

    JIMMYBUFFETT Skinwalker

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    Bought it for $10.99 on Itunes. Like all of Hendrix work it's fantastic. I don't think there's ever been a musician with a more vivid imagination that flowed through their instrument than Hendrix. The dude channeled his emotions right through his fingers.
  3. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Closest thing I have seen was Stevie Ray Vaughan. I would sit there in amazement watching that man on the guitar
  4. JIMMYBUFFETT

    JIMMYBUFFETT Skinwalker

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    If you like Hendrix and SRV, listen to Tab Benoit. He's one of the better blues guitarists I've heard in a long time. I've been listening to a lot of Benoit, Patrick Sweany, Backdoor Slam, and Gov't Mule here lately. It seems like some of the power blues bands are starting to turn up again.
  5. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    will do. SRV I got to see a lot of in small night clubs here in Houston and in Austin well before he made it nation wide. Watching him up close was a pleasure.
  6. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

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    I love me some Hendrix. He and John Frusciante were probably the two most influential players on my musical style and both gave me a lot to think about when playing my own music, which is all I ever do.

    I recently started playing again, too. So I'm going to have to check this out. Thanks for posting.
  7. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

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    I like Hendrix. SRV was a little too flashy and most of his good stuff was written by Hendrix anyway. He was a great player, but stylistically I think he was lacking what Hendrix had--originality.
  8. 5Stars

    5Stars Here comes the Sun...

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    :toast:
  9. RS12

    RS12 Well-Known Member

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    Even Clapton was in awe of Jimi. Listening to the song "Are you experienced" though head phones I am continually amazed at what he got that Strat to do.
  10. Jerruh

    Jerruh Active Member

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    Hey McCoy, what kind of setup are you playing on? I just recently started playing again and Im playing a Schecter hellraiser c1/Gibson SG through a peavey Valveking halfstack.
  11. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

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    I'm playing a 90s American made telecaster through a 60s Princeton Reverb. Nothing too special and loud, but it has a nice tone. I just get bored with Fender.

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