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More Obama "Spiritual Advisor" ramblings..

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by Dallas, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. Dallas

    Dallas Old bulletproof tiger

    11,515 Messages
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    In a fiery sermon taped and available on DVD, Barack Obama’s longtime pastor and spiritual adviser can be seen and heard saying three times: “God damn America.”

    The Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr., in his taped sermons, also questioned America’s role in the spread of the AIDS virus and suggested that the United States bore some responsibility for the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.
    Confronting the content of some of Wright’s sermons, parts of which have been aired this week on FOX News, the Obama campaign is continuing to distance itself from the pastor’s rhetoric. But it is stopping short of a full repudiation.

    Wright’s supporters say his Afro-centric sermons accurately portray black America, and they contend his sermons are widely studied by theologians. But critics are now calling attention to some of his words from the pulpit.
    The pastor delivered his final sermon last month and retired as leader of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. Obama has attended the church for 20 years and calls Wright his spiritual adviser.

    Click here to visit the Trinity United Church of Christ’s Web site.

    In a fiery sermon in April 2003, Wright said: “The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes three-strike laws and wants them to sing God Bless America.

    “No! No No!

    “God damn America … for killing innocent people.

    “God damn America for threatening citizens as less than humans.

    “God damn America as long as she tries to act like she is God and supreme.”

    In DVD copies of his sermons available for purchase, Wright can also be seen questioning America’s role in the spreading of the HIV virus that leads to AIDS. In another speech, made in the days after 9/11, he suggested that American foreign policy invited the terror attacks.

    “We bombed Hiroshima. We bombed Nagasaki. And we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon and we never batted an eye,” Wright said.

    “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because of stuff we have done overseas is now brought back into our own backyard. America is chickens coming home to roost.”

    The pastor also said: “The government lied about inventing the HIV virus as a means of genocide against people of color. The government lied.”
    Late Thursday, the Obama campaign said it has distanced itself from certain comments made by the pastor. But it did not fully repudiate Wright himself — as some critics have called for.

    “Senator Obama has said before that he profoundly disagrees with some of the statements and positions of Reverend Wright, who has preached his last sermon as pastor at the church,” Obama campaign spokesman

    Bill Burton said. “Senator Obama deplores divisive statements whether they come from his supporters, the supporters of his opponent, talk radio, or anywhere else.”

    Last year, Obama rescinded an invitation to Wright to deliver the invocation at his announcement that he was running for president. He also issued a statement saying personal attacks have no place in politics after Wright delivered an attack on Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton.
    But Obama’s longtime relationship with Wright is continuing to spark controversy.

    “This is not just someone that Barack Obama has a casual relationship with,” said Tom Bevan, executive editor of RealClearPolitics.com. He noted that Wright married Barack and Michelle Obama, and Wright’s words were the inspiration for the title of Obama’s book, “The Audacity of Hope.”

    “Barack Obama has not out and out distanced himself from all of these comments … ,” said Patricia Murphy, editor of CitizenJanePolitics.com. “It’s unclear if he rejects all of these statements. I would assume that he does, but I think he is going to be pushed where he needs to come out and fully explain his relationship with his pastor.”

    Some of Wright’s statements have raised eyebrows at a time the Internal Revenue Service is scrutinizing tax-exempt religious organizations for alleged violations of rules barring them from participating in political campaigns.
    Prior to his retirement last month, Wright delivered commentary from the pulpit in which he praised Obama, as well as remarks focusing on the racial divide between Obama and Clinton.

    “There is a man here who can take this country in a new direction,” Wright said during his Jan. 13 sermon.

    During a Christmas sermon, Wright tried to compare Obama’s upbringing to Jesus at the hands of the Romans.

    “Barack knows what it means living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Wright said. “Hillary would never know that.
    “Hillary ain’t never been called a ******. Hillary has never had a people defined as a non-person.”

    In a Jan. 13 sermon, Wright said:

    “Hillary is married to Bill, and Bill has been good to us. No he ain’t! Bill did us, just like he did Monica Lewinsky. He was riding dirty.”

    So far the Clinton campaign has been quiet over Wright’s comments.


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    The things this man is saying/has said is going to wear Obama out defending him. It's just getting started.

    BTW:

    Maybe Sassy knows. Sas? Did we really invent the HIV virus to kill off the black population? I can blame that on America also?

    I just need to keep tabs on how much hate I really have to keep in supply for my own nation. I am so far behind. :rolleyes:
  2. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    Real winner Obama has followed. Seems to me if you did not believe in the mans views you would go to another church or follow a different religous leader.
  3. Danny White

    Danny White Winter is Coming

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    Apparently he doesn't take that "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain" commandment very seriously.


  4. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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  5. Dallas

    Dallas Old bulletproof tiger

    11,515 Messages
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    Hahah - Now Obama comes out against his pastor. FIRE FIRE !! DAMAGE CONTROL REPORT!! REPORT !!


    Barack Obama on Friday answered critics’ calls to condemn controversial sermons by his longtime Chicago pastor, issuing his firmest denunciation to date and describing the Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr.’s anti-U.S. remarks as “inflammatory and appalling.”​

    Obama said he never personally heard Wright preach the statements at the center of the controversy, but he first learned of them when he launched his presidential campaign.​

    “Let me say at the outset that I vehemently disagree and strongly condemn the statements that have been the subject of this controversy,” he said in the statement. “I categorically denounce any statement that disparages our great country or serves to divide us from our allies. I also believe that words that degrade individuals have no place in our public dialogue, whether it’s on the campaign stump or in the pulpit. In sum, I reject outright the statements by Rev. Wright that are at issue.”​

    The statement came as critics called on the Illinois senator and Democratic presidential candidate to do more to distance himself from Wright, Obama’s longtime pastor and spiritual adviser. Obama has attended the Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago for 20 years, and initially stopped short of a full repudiation.​

    In a fiery sermon recorded and available on DVD, Wright can be seen and heard saying three times: “God damn America.”
    In his recorded sermons, he also questions America’s role in the spread of the AIDS virus and suggests that the United States bore some responsibility for the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.​

    “We bombed Hiroshima. We bombed Nagasaki. And we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon and we never batted an eye,” Wright said.​

    “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because of stuff we have done overseas is now brought back into our own backyard. America is chickens coming home to roost.”​

    The pastor also said: “The government lied about inventing the HIV virus as a means of genocide against people of color. The government lied.”​

    Wright’s supporters say his sermons accurately portray black America, and they contend his sermons are widely studied by theologians.​

    “I’ve been at some of those sermons,” the Rev. Dwight Hopkins, a member of the church, told FOX News. “The majority of Wrights’ sermons speak to healing, he challenges the black community … to be more responsible.”
    In his statement, Obama drew distinctions between Wright and the congregation at large, and between Wright’s sermons now and his teachings during Obama’s earlier years with the church.​

    “It’s a congregation that does not merely preach social justice but acts it out each day, through ministries ranging from housing the homeless to reaching out to those with HIV/AIDS,” Obama said.​

    “Most importantly, Rev. Wright preached the gospel of Jesus, a gospel on which I base my life. In other words, he has never been my political adviser; he’s been my pastor. And the sermons I heard him preach always related to our obligation to love God and one another, to work on behalf of the poor, and to seek justice at every turn.”​

    Obama said Wright’s controversial statements have “pained and angered me,” but urged voters to “judge me not on the basis of what someone else said, but on the basis of who I am and what I believe in; on my values, judgment and experience to be President of the United States.”​

    He said he did not leave the congregation upon learning of Wright’s more divisive remarks, because of his “strong links” to the church, where he married his wife and where his daughters were baptized.​

    Wright was also under fire for using the pulpit to inject himself into the presidential campaign, making remarks that focused on the racial divide between Obama and Hillary Clinton.​

    “Barack knows what it means living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Wright said in one sermon. “Hillary would never know that.”​

    The pastor delivered his final sermon last month and retired as leader of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago.​

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