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MSNBC: McCain Takes Five Point Lead

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by ScipioCowboy, Aug 20, 2008.

  1. ScipioCowboy

    ScipioCowboy More than meets the eye. Zone Supporter

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    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26308429

    McCain takes 5-point lead over Obama

    Poll: Republican seen as a stronger manager of the economy

    WASHINGTON - In a sharp turnaround, Republican John McCain has opened a 5-point lead on Democrat Barack Obama in the U.S. presidential race and is seen as a stronger manager of the economy, according to a Reuters/Zogby poll released on Wednesday.

    McCain leads Obama among likely U.S. voters by 46 percent to 41 percent, wiping out Obama's solid 7-point advantage in July and taking his first lead in the monthly Reuters/Zogby poll.

    The reversal follows a month of attacks by McCain, who has questioned Obama's experience, criticized his opposition to most new offshore oil drilling and mocked his overseas trip.

    The poll was taken Thursday through Saturday as Obama wrapped up a weeklong vacation in Hawaii that ceded the political spotlight to McCain, who seized on Russia's invasion of Georgia to emphasize his foreign policy views.

    "There is no doubt the campaign to discredit Obama is paying off for McCain right now," pollster John Zogby said. "This is a significant ebb for Obama."

    McCain now has a 9-point edge, 49 percent to 40 percent, over Obama on the critical question of who would be the best manager of the economy -- an issue nearly half of voters said was their top concern in the November 4 presidential election.

    That margin reversed Obama's 4-point edge last month on the economy over McCain, an Arizona senator and former Vietnam prisoner of war who has admitted a lack of economic expertise and shows far greater interest in foreign and military policy.

    McCain has been on the offensive against Obama during the last month over energy concerns, with polls showing strong majorities supporting his call for an expansion of offshore oil drilling as gasoline prices hover near $4 a gallon.

    Obama had opposed new offshore drilling, but said recently he would support a limited expansion as part of a comprehensive energy program.

    That was one of several recent policy shifts for Obama, as he positions himself for the general election battle. But Zogby said the changes could be taking a toll on Obama's support, particularly among Democrats and self-described liberals.

    That hairline difference between nuance and what appears to be flip-flopping is hurting him with liberal voters," Zogby said.

    Obama's support among Democrats fell 9 percentage points this month to 74 percent, while McCain has the backing of 81 percent of Republicans. Support for Obama, an Illinois senator, fell 12 percentage points among liberals, with 10 percent of liberals still undecided compared to 9 percent of conservatives.

    Obama needs to work on base
    "Conservatives were supposed to be the bigger problem for McCain," Zogby said. "Obama still has work to do on his base. At this point McCain seems to be doing a better job with his."

    The dip in support for Obama, who would be the first black U.S. president, cut across demographic and ideological lines. He slipped among Catholics, born-again Christians, women, independents and younger voters. He retained the support of more than 90 percent of black voters.

    "There were no wild swings, there isn't one group that is radically different than last month or even two months ago. It was just a steady decline for Obama across the board," Zogby said.

    Obama's support among voters between the ages of 18 and 29, which had been one of his strengths, slipped 12 percentage points to 52 percent. McCain, who will turn 72 next week, was winning 40 percent of younger voters.

    "Those are not the numbers Obama needs to win," Zogby said about Americans under 30. The 47-year-old is counting on a strong turnout among young voters, a key bloc of support during his primary battle with New York Sen. Hillary Clinton.

    It made little difference when independent candidate Ralph Nader and Libertarian Party candidate Bob Barr, who are both trying to add their names to state ballots.

    McCain still held a 5-point edge over Obama, 44 percent to 39 percent, when all four names were included. Barr earned 3 percent and Nader 2 percent.

    Most national polls have given Obama a narrow lead over McCain throughout the summer. In the Reuters/Zogby poll, Obama had a 5-point lead in June, shortly after he clinched the Democratic nomination, and an 8-point lead on McCain in May.

    The telephone poll of 1,089 likely voters had a margin of error of 3 percentage points.

    The poll was taken as both candidates head into their nominating conventions and the announcements of their choices of vice presidential picks. The Democratic convention begins on Monday in Denver, with the Republican convention opening the next Monday, September 1, in St. Paul, Minnesota.
  2. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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  3. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Once preschool lets out, the resident libs are gonna come in here seething.
  4. bbgun

    bbgun Benched

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    Racism. That's the only explanation.

    *plonk*
  5. ScipioCowboy

    ScipioCowboy More than meets the eye. Zone Supporter

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    :lmao2:

    I'm very curious as to what they'll say. Thus far, the only polls that have been positive for McCain have come from Rasmussen, which certain posters have dismissed as "Republican-biased."

    These new polls, however, are the product of Reuters/Zogby. Will they be heralded as the new Republican propaganda polling service?

    :laugh2:
  6. CanadianCowboysFan

    CanadianCowboysFan Lightning Rod

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    It's funny, reactionaries see liberals are stupid, head nodders ******** and immature. Liberals see reactionaries as stupid, rednecks, head nodders, immature and ********.

    Does that mean everyone is stupid, ********, immature and a head nodder?

    The Democrats will rue the day they picked Obama over Hillary. The Clintons don't lose.
  7. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Yet she did
  8. Angus

    Angus Active Member

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    Not yet. Obama has not been nominated. He merely presumes he will be. Anything can happen now.

    :)
  9. CanadianCowboysFan

    CanadianCowboysFan Lightning Rod

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    actually, she won the real states, and had more votes (and who knows what would have happened if they had counted all the states and not frozen Florida and Michigan out).

    Anyway, are you a ********, immature, redneck stupid head nodder reactionary?
  10. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Man ..... that would tear that party apart.

    There would be riots at the dmc.
  11. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    McCain takes lead over Obama: poll


    By John Whitesides, Political Correspondent


    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In a sharp turnaround, Republican John McCain has opened a 5-point lead on Democrat Barack Obama in the U.S. presidential race and is seen as a stronger manager of the economy, according to a Reuters/Zogby poll released on Wednesday.


    McCain leads Obama among likely U.S. voters by 46 percent to 41 percent, wiping out Obama's solid 7-point advantage in July and taking his first lead in the monthly Reuters/Zogby poll.


    The reversal follows a month of attacks by McCain, who has questioned Obama's experience, criticized his opposition to most new offshore oil drilling and mocked his overseas trip.


    The poll was taken Thursday through Saturday as Obama wrapped up a weeklong vacation in Hawaii that ceded the political spotlight to McCain, who seized on Russia's invasion of Georgia to emphasize his foreign policy views.


    "There is no doubt the campaign to discredit Obama is paying off for McCain right now," pollster John Zogby said. "This is a significant ebb for Obama."
    McCain now has a 9-point edge, 49 percent to 40 percent, over Obama on the critical question of who would be the best manager of the economy -- an issue nearly half of voters said was their top concern in the November 4 presidential election.


    That margin reversed Obama's 4-point edge last month on the economy over McCain, an Arizona senator and former Vietnam prisoner of war who has admitted a lack of economic expertise and shows far greater interest in foreign and military policy.


    McCain has been on the offensive against Obama during the last month over energy concerns, with polls showing strong majorities supporting his call for an expansion of offshore oil drilling as gasoline prices hover near $4 a gallon.


    Obama had opposed new offshore drilling, but said recently he would support a limited expansion as part of a comprehensive energy program.


    That was one of several recent policy shifts for Obama, as he positions himself for the general election battle. But Zogby said the changes could be taking a toll on Obama's support, particularly among Democrats and self-described liberals.


    "That hairline difference between nuance and what appears to be flip-flopping is hurting him with liberal voters," Zogby said.


    Obama's support among Democrats fell 9 percentage points this month to 74 percent, while McCain has the backing of 81 percent of Republicans. Support for Obama, an Illinois senator, fell 12 percentage points among liberals, with 10 percent of liberals still undecided compared to 9 percent of conservatives.


    OBAMA NEEDS TO WORK ON BASE


    "Conservatives were supposed to be the bigger problem for McCain," Zogby said. "Obama still has work to do on his base. At this point McCain seems to be doing a better job with his."


    The dip in support for Obama, who would be the first black U.S. president, cut across demographic and ideological lines. He slipped among Catholics, born-again Christians, women, independents and younger voters. He retained the support of more than 90 percent of black voters.


    "There were no wild swings, there isn't one group that is radically different than last month or even two months ago. It was just a steady decline for Obama across the board," Zogby said.


    Obama's support among voters between the ages of 18 and 29, which had been one of his strengths, slipped 12 percentage points to 52 percent. McCain, who will turn 72 next week, was winning 40 percent of younger voters.


    "Those are not the numbers Obama needs to win," Zogby said about Americans under 30. The 47-year-old is counting on a strong turnout among young voters, a key bloc of support during his primary battle with New York Sen. Hillary Clinton.


    It made little difference when independent candidate Ralph Nader and Libertarian Party candidate Bob Barr, who are both trying to add their names to state ballots.


    McCain still held a 5-point edge over Obama, 44 percent to 39 percent, when all four names were included. Barr earned 3 percent and Nader 2 percent.


    Most national polls have given Obama a narrow lead over McCain throughout the summer. In the Reuters/Zogby poll, Obama had a 5-point lead in June, shortly after he clinched the Democratic nomination, and an 8-point lead on McCain in May.


    The telephone poll of 1,089 likely voters had a margin of error of 3 percentage points.


    The poll was taken as both candidates head into their nominating conventions and the announcements of their choices of vice presidential picks. The Democratic convention begins on Monday in Denver, with the Republican convention opening the next Monday, September 1, in St. Paul, Minnesota..


    http://www.reuters.com/article/topN...?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&rpc=22&sp=true

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  12. Cajuncowboy

    Cajuncowboy Preacher From The Black Lagoon

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    Hmmm, that thought brings a misty tear to my eye. :lmao2:

    loser dems.

    I know concord is getting a new sig in November.
  13. bbgun

    bbgun Benched

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    After Barack Obama hype, a backlash

    Michael Goodwin
    NY Daily News

    The headline conveyed urgency: "Obama Ready to Announce Running Mate" said a breathless New York Times. In language worthy of a Madison Avenue pitchman, the paper reported Obama had "all but settled" on his choice and would launch "an elaborate rollout plan" of events.

    Holy hype, Batman. Another day, another inflated report on the routine doings of The One.

    John McCain's mocking nickname for Obama came in an ad comparing Obama's grandiose promises to Moses parting the Red Sea. It was funny, but I'm starting to think it wasn't a joke. The Obama campaign and its media handmaidens are taking their candidate way too seriously.

    So much so that they could be setting up a backlash against the hype. No human being can meet the wildly inflated expectations that accompany the rookie senator's every move. It can't help that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called Obama "a leader that God has blessed us with at this time."

    That's the kind of remark that can turn voters into problems. Most Americans famously resent being told an election is over months before the polls open or that God is taking sides.

    Maybe that's why recent surveys show Obama underperforming. Although Democrats enjoy a 10- to 12-point generic lead over Republicans, Obama and McCain are essentially tied.

    The dead heat is a concern to many top Democrats, given the national mood. Although polls at this stage can be notoriously fickle, the anti-Republican sentiment is clear when 81% of voters say the nation is on the wrong track. Such a lopsided finding should be an impossible hurdle for any candidate seeking a party's third consecutive term in the White House, as McCain is.

    While McCain has complained about media favoritism toward Obama, most recently about NBC News' tilted coverage, maybe he ought to encourage it. Resentment over the media love affair with Obama might be McCain's most powerful weapon.

    The fawning coverage exaggerates even routine Obama events, and when he fails to meet giddy expectations, the excuse machine warps into overtime. That, in turn, creates another unappealing layer of media-imposed conventional wisdom.

    Take the results of the weekend faith forum. With most commentators saying McCain did better than Obama in giving straight, clear answers to pastor Rick Warren's questions, the Obama camp suggested McCain knew the questions in advance. The assumption was clear: Obama is so much smarter that McCain couldn't possibly win without cheating.

    The selection of running mates is following the same script. McCain's camp said he would make his announcement Aug. 29, and that was matter-of-factly noted. But Obama's choice is being treated like the Second Coming, as though this is the selection of a certain vice president, not merely a running mate.

    The Times, which delivers an almost-daily front-page assault on McCain, pumped up the timing as though Obama's musings were news. But with the convention less than a week away, Obama can't wait much longer.

    And what does it mean he has "all but settled" on a choice? That's a snake-oil way of saying he hasn't made a final decision. And the "elaborate rollout plan" it touted is a fairly routine schedule of joint appearances.

    It's all par for the unfair course. The ombudsman for The Washington Post, Deborah Howell, scolded her paper for running three times as many front page stories on Obama as McCain since June and for publishing about 50% more pictures of Obama. She also cited a wider survey of papers, radio, TV and Web sites that show Obama getting more coverage in eight of the last nine weeks.

    So The One has been anointed. If I were running the Obama campaign, I'd be terrified. After all, the last person the media declared inevitable was Hillary Clinton.
  14. Royal Laegotti

    Royal Laegotti Dyin' ain't much of a livin', boy!

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    More like punished us with instead of blessed us with Nancy you ditz!:cool:
  15. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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  16. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Bad Santa Staff Member

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  17. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed...part 2 Zone Supporter

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    no. it means both sides look at the worst of the "other side" to define that side out of their own convenience.
  18. Doomsday101

    Doomsday101 Well-Known Member

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    Or you could say the far left and the far right is not what this nation needs right now. For things to get done both parties must work together and normally where you see positive movement in Washington is when moderates from both parties get together and come up with idea and solutions.
  19. ConcordCowboy

    ConcordCowboy Mr. Buckeye

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    Your posts are going to look good in Scarlet.

    :D
  20. CanadianCowboysFan

    CanadianCowboysFan Lightning Rod

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    It was more of a rhetorical question that anything. Of course, we all know only the right wing are stupid, immature and ******** :cool:

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