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Not race baiting. A serious thread

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by Midswat, May 9, 2004.

  1. Lord Sun

    Lord Sun New Member

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    Guts? Nah, I think people just figured the question was a dumb question; most people could not care less the ethnic derivation or pigmentation of sports commentators, nor - I think - do most commentators appear to care whether a given player is "black" or "white."

    Chinese, Mexican, Vietnamese and Persian are somewhat different, though based less on race than on nationality, combined with the fact that they're so rare. It makes sense to back the one man who is bucking the statistical odds to make it in football or any othere sphere of activity. Ngyuen, Doug Williams, your Persian buddy and Yao Ming are sort of underdogs, based just on the fact that they're "alone" when they take to the field. A "black" quarteback in 2004? Not a rarity, not an oddity, not a special case, and definitely not requiring a great deal of "guts" to talk about.

    All that having been said, I have very little in common with any "black" people on this board, aside from the fact that we're all rabid fans of America's finest football team.
  2. maloy

    maloy Drama King

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    "Randy Galloway, aka Jake Dellhome Nut Licker"

    So true its not even funny, can't stand his a**
  3. CapnComeback

    CapnComeback New Member

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    As an African-American, I wish people would just look at Carter's statistics. Statistics don't favor or discriminate against him because of his race and they thoroughly tell the tale.

    I don't understand how anyone who looks at his numbers can justify him being considered anything but a transitional starter by default. He has ALWAYS thrown more interceptions than touchdowns and his passer rating has been a constant low 70 since he's been in the league.

    I don't want to hear about how Carter has no running game to support him. He isn't the first/only quarterback to not have a decent running attack behind him... Dan Marino only had a 1,000 yard rusher behind him once or twice in his whole career. When Marino played he always had to put up a lot of points because the Dolphin Defense sucked in the 80's/early 90's.

    I don't want to hear about his offensive line being bad either because there are a lot worse lines in the league i.e. Cleveland, NY Giants, Buffalo, San Diego, etc.
  4. trickblue

    trickblue Old Testament... Zone Supporter

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    [IMG]
  5. adbutcher

    adbutcher K9NME

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    That was eloquently stated, thank you.

    You can tell when someone doesn’t have a clue about team sports. The beauty of football is that when you compete side by side with a person the adversity you face forges life long friendship that transcends race. Q being black is of no consequence to the people that count, the owner, his coaches, and his teammates. If he proves he can’t do it he will be replaced. It is really that simple. I don’t care what writer says what about any of our players. It is just there opinion. Just like it is my opinion to question the true motivation behind this thread.

    If you have something to say why don’t you just say it? Don’t beat around the bush and play cute with the subject. If you don’t have any mal-intentions concerning this thread, please forgive me. However, whenever someone prefaces a thread with a title of “Not race baiting”, the cynic in me thinks it is just that.
  6. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    You are the man Ad...the more I read from you...the more I like you.
  7. Hostile

    Hostile Tacos are a good investment Zone Supporter

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    Very well stated. In the locker room guys say stuff to each other that if the press ever got wind of it they'd swear things were in total disarray. In reality it is just guys who stand shoulder to shoulder ribbing each other. That's just the way it is when you've got a bunch of guys together who like each other and enjoy poking fun.

    Nine times out of ten I think the media gets too caught up in conspiracies and backbiting. That's why I take what they say with a grain of salt. The media does provide a service to us as fans by gving us food for thought to discuss in forums like this. That is the extent of their impact and value on the game of football and what happens behind the scenes. The truth is they don't know, but are paid to speculate. I don't care about any hidden agendas. I just want news.
  8. adbutcher

    adbutcher K9NME

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    Thanks bro. The feeling is definitely mutual.
  9. adbutcher

    adbutcher K9NME

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    Thanks Hos, Man if my old junior high, high school, and college locker rooms were totally open to the public, politicians, priests, and the press would have had a field day.

    I am sure things are a little different in the NFL. However, talking to guys that I know that played/playing in the NFL there isn’t that much of difference. Some of the things that players say to one another could only be said to someone that you care about and the feeling is reciprocated because in the real world it would lead to a instant fight.

    For example if a player with a lisp or a player with a mother who questioned his sexuality were on my team, they would have gotten ribbed unmercifully. Think of some of the most hurtful things you could say to the aforementioned and multiply it by ten that is the level and intensity of some of the insults that would have been hurled about.

    I am sure some of the military folk here or any body that went through a type of hell with a group of people can easily relate.

    The bottom line for me is I wish everyone in the world could suffer a situation with a group of people outside of their racial comfort zone because racial harmony would greatly benefit from it, IMO. *steps down from my soap box* :)
  10. Bach

    Bach Benched

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    Let's see, you're an Eagles fan, you like QC, you admit he's a below avg. QB, but you say that's not the reason you like him.

    Then why do you like him?
  11. BulletBob

    BulletBob The Godfather

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    Just wanted to throw in my $0.02.

    For me, unfortunately, race does play a role in many discussions. Like many of you (whether or not you choose to admit it), I was raised in a racially/nationality-prejudiced environment. My parents were very ignorant about the equality of all individuals. Growing up in such an environment, where stereotypes are routinely enforced, it becomes almost instinctual to have certain reactions leap into the subconscious when a person of color is discussed.

    Think about it - if your parents (and grandparents, aunts, & uncles) constantly told you, growing up, that British Bulldogs were vicious, mean-spirited creatures, no matter how much you eventually educated yourself on various dog breeds, and no matter how many Bulldogs with which you came in contact, no matter how much you knew that your parents were dead wrong, you still have a gut instinct when you walk down the street and see a Bulldog. That reaction stems from your very early childhood.

    So, since that time, at least for me, every single instance which involves race, that gut instinct (twinge of prejudice) rises from my core, and I have to do everything I can to beat it back by reasoning with myself that this is not the proper way to think. It works, and works well. But this counter-action has taken years to effectively take hold, so that it now routinely and forcefully overtakes that initial gut reaction. Not a day goes by that I don't regret being a part of an environment that created that gut instinct. The twinge is always there.

    So, in turn, I have vowed never to pass on any such stereotypes to my children. They have been brought up in a completely race-neutral environment (as far as their parents' teaching goes). Minor damage is sometimes done when their grandparents still slip with a bigoted comment now and then, but we quickly address the situation, and chastise the "elders" for perpetuating such false notions.

    It is my sincere hope that my children, being brought up in a much more race-neutral environment will simply not have the same "gut reactions" with which I have had to grapple, and that their children, in turn will view the world as truly color-blind. My hope is that the first instance that my grandchildren ever sense that race is, or ever was, an issue is in studying history in grade school, and learning the devastating effects that such feelings caused a particular race in this country's history.

    If each generation does their part to minimize the effect of prejudice and racism, perhaps our grandchildren will live in the world that Dr. King had envisioned almost half a century ago.

    Now that I've spilled my guts out on the table ... on to Quincy. I am torn. Unlike many of you, I am not often able to easily separate a player's character from his performance. Character counts (to me). Given this kid's history, and how he turned his life around, I'd love for this kid to succeed. I love to point out sports figures to my kids who achieve greatness on the field, and achieve success in life, against great odds. Like it or not, kids look up to sports figures. They see you admire them, and they want to as well. They pay attention to what happens outside the ring of competition.

    I love to hear about the great ones giving back to the community. I always share this with my kids. I've told them about Q making mistakes in his life both on and off the field, and how he buckled down, and has shown a tremendous work ethic. I've told them about Pat Tillman, and what he sacrificed to protect them.

    Still in all, every time Quincy takes the field, it drives me crazy that he does not perform at a consistently high level. I want to see Aikman out there again. Now is this the "Bulldog" factor rising up, or simply just an objective analysis of performance? I can't be 100% sure, but I'd be willing to bet you dollars to donuts that to my two sons, the guy's skin color has nothing to do with it ... they just want to see the good guy do well.
  12. DallasCowpoke111

    DallasCowpoke111 Benched

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    good attitude and nice post, although, it DID kinda flip me out when i looked at the top of the page and there's a link to "British Bulldog Breeders!!"

    i was like..... " :eek: *** :confused: !!??"
  13. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Well...you know it is a dog eat dog world out there...and many of us are wearing milk bone underwear. :eek:
  14. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Nice post Bullet.
  15. DallasCowpoke111

    DallasCowpoke111 Benched

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    :rolleyes:

    mannnn, you are so "Dad joke," it's not even funny!!! :p
  16. Irving Cowboy

    Irving Cowboy The Chief

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    Thanks Norm.... :D
  17. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Well what do you expect when I have to be clean :(

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