U.S. officials rethink hopes for Iraq democracy

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by thescarface1989, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. thescarface1989

    thescarface1989 New Member

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    BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- Nightmarish political realities in Baghdad are prompting American officials to curb their vision for democracy in Iraq. Instead, the officials now say they are willing to settle for a government that functions and can bring security.

    Continuing violence -- like this Baghdad blast from May -- is causing a rethink of U.S. goals, generals say.

    A workable democratic and sovereign government in Iraq was one of the Bush administration's stated goals of the war.

    But for the first time, exasperated front-line U.S. generals talk openly of non-democratic governmental alternatives, and while the two top U.S. officials in Iraq still talk about preserving the country's nascent democratic institutions, they say their ambitions aren't as "lofty" as they once had been.

    "Democratic institutions are not necessarily the way ahead in the long-term future," said Brig. Gen. John "Mick" Bednarek, part of Task Force Lightning in Diyala province, one of the war's major battlegrounds.

    The comments reflect a practicality common among Western diplomats and officials trying to win hearts and minds in the Middle East and other non-Western countries where democracy isn't a tradition.

    The failure of Iraq to emerge from widespread instability is a bitter pill for the United States, which optimistically toppled the Saddam Hussein regime more than four years ago. Millions of Iraqis went to the polls to cast ballots, something that generated great promise for the establishment of a democratic system.

    But Iraqi institutions, from the infrastructure to the national government, are widely regarded as ineffective in the fifth year of the war.

    U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker and Gen. David Petraeus, the top American commander in Iraq, declined to be interviewed for this story, but they issued a joint statement to CNN that reiterated that the country's "fundamental democratic framework is in place" and that "the development of democratic institutions is being encouraged."

    And, they said, they are helping Iraqi political leaders find ways "to share power and achieve legislative progress."

    But Crocker and Petraeus conceded they are "now engaged in pursuing less lofty and ambitious goals than was the case at the outset."

    Maj. Gen. Benjamin Mixon, commander of Task Force Lightning, also reflected a less lofty American goal for Iraq's future.

    "I would describe it as leaving an effective government behind that can provide services to its people, and security. It needs to be an effective and functioning government that is really a partner with the United States and the rest of the world in this fight against the terrorists," said Mixon, who will not be perturbed if such goals are reached without democracy.

    "Well, see that all over the Middle East," he said, stating that democracy is merely an option, that Iraqis are free to choose or reject.

    "But that is the $50,000 question. ... What will this government look like? Will it be a democracy? Will it not?" he asked.

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