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Weekly Mock v.2

Discussion in 'Draft Zone' started by LatinMind, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    Trade down pick up a 3rd and 7th

    RD1 DJ Fluker T Bama

    Big and Nasty, Something this team needs. Too many finesse type of players along the OL. They need a mauler.

    RD2 Sylvester Williams DT UNC
    Penetrating DT with a mean streak. Big and not affraid to mix it up inside.

    RD3 Cornellius Carradine DE FSU
    Disruptive and stout against the run for noles. Good fit for the strong side.

    RD3 Alvin Bailey G Arkansas
    New blood to the interior and could ease Bernadeau to C

    RD4 TJ McDonald S USC
    Still think this is a pick Kiffin could fight for. He thinks highly of him

    RD5 Kenjon Barner RB Oregon
    Little guy with a punch.

    RD6 Michael Williams TE Bama
    Big nasty TE, essential for the goaline

    RD7 Zach Line FB SMU
    Can run that 4th and short, catch out of the backfield and block.

    UDFA
    Travis Howard CB Ohio State
    Michael Mauti LB Penn State
    Kapron Lewis-Moore ND
    Wes Horton DE USC
    Marquis Jackson DE Portlant State
    John Sullen G Auburn
    Reggie Dunn WR Utah
  2. supercowboy8

    supercowboy8 Well-Known Member

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    Worse draft I have seen this year

    Fluker is the last person this OL needs. We run a zone scheme, last thing we need is a slow heavy footed OT going against NYG, Phili, and Washington.

    Slyvester Williams is a pick I wouldn't mind, just depends on who else is there.

    TJ McDonald, we need guys that can cover and he played awful under Kiffin.
  3. robert70x7

    robert70x7 Active Member

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    There has been much worse.

    And for the record, Michael Williams is softer than a roll of Charmin.
  4. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    People who have their minds set on picks usually come out with this type of post. Doesnt bother me.

    Have to disagree with you on Williams tho. If the guy can show skills as a receiving TE. He would make a big jump. Guy is very good at blocking. His knock is receiving. But Bama didnt really throw to their TEs or anybody else that wasnt named Cooper lol
  5. supercowboy8

    supercowboy8 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I only liked the sylvester Williams pick and that's It. If this is what jerry does. I will br pissed and ready to pick top 5 next year. We need day one difference makers that gits the schemes we run.
  6. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    First off, Dallas ran a man on man blocking scheme. But switched when it was clear Cook couldnt handle it, and Free couldnt block either.

    If Kiffin likes TJ and he's already came out basically said that. Youre going to say he dont fit? Maybe you should be the DC.

    People want THE NAME with every pick.
  7. supercowboy8

    supercowboy8 Well-Known Member

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    Your the one picking the name with your first four picks. Also we switched to zone blocking when Callahan came in because that's the style he runs. If you knew anything about football you would know, every where he goes its a zone blocking scheme.

    Kiffun says be like McDonald but that's doesnt mean he thinks he ia the best player amd the svouts rank the players not kiffin. McDonald was at USC when kiffin came there and was worse every year under kiffin.

    You obviously haven't paid attention to anything I post if you think I want big names. I have been talking up sleepers from day one and I look for guys that for the system and I watch alot of college football, I go by my eyes not just what a few websites and YouTube videos tell me.

    You mock OS bad, that just IMO, don't post if you get sad and upset when people don't agree.
  8. Goldenrichards83

    Goldenrichards83 Active Member

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    I actually like this mock. Fluker I'm my opinion will be a beast on the next level. I was gonna do a mock with the same trade down scenario but I would use my extra 3rd to trade up in the 2nd and get Warford. Imagine Fluker and Warford on the right side, running game solved.
  9. Dash28

    Dash28 Felis silvestris catus

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    Exactly, it's just your opinion.

    That doesn't mean you're right though and act like you have all the answers when it comes to the draft.
  10. supercowboy8

    supercowboy8 Well-Known Member

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    we better switch to a man power blocking then and fire Callahan, only way those two will work. Neither fit Callahan style.
  11. supercowboy8

    supercowboy8 Well-Known Member

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    But I am right, sorry you can like players that don't fit the scheme all you want. Its not that I don't like Fluker or Warford, I just don't think they fit the scheme Dallas runs. If you think I'm wrong, then that makes me right.
  12. xwalker

    xwalker Well-Known Member

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    I like some of the picks and not so much on others.

    RD1 DJ Fluker T Bama
    Regardless of scheme, I'm not a big fan of Fluker as an OT; however, I think he could be a dominant OG. Even at OG, he would be better in a Man-blocking scheme, IMO.

    RD2 Sylvester Williams DT UNC
    Good pick.

    RD3 Cornellius Carradine DE FSU
    I think that this would be a good pick. He will need to get a little bigger to play the Strong-Side, but adding 10 lbs does not seem unreasonable.

    RD3 Alvin Bailey G Arkansas
    I like the player, but I'm not sure that he will be the best OG available here, especially if you take scheme into consideration.

    RD4 TJ McDonald S USC
    I don't like this pick at all. I have him rated as the 16 best Safety in this draft. I would expect Kiffin to say that he likes his former player regardless of how he rates compared to others. I could see him bulking up a little and playing LB in a Kiffin style defense.

    RD5 Kenjon Barner RB Oregon
    Love this pick if he is available here. He is a good receiver also.

    RD6 Michael Williams TE Bama
    Excellent blocking TE that can catch a few passes.

    RD7 Zach Line FB SMU
    Interesting player. I would like to have a FB that is a threat to run with the ball on occasion.

    UDFA
    Travis Howard CB Ohio State
    Michael Mauti LB Penn State
    Kapron Lewis-Moore ND
    Wes Horton DE USC
    Marquis Jackson DE Portlant State
    John Sullen G Auburn
    Reggie Dunn WR Utah


    Good list of UDFAs. I especially like Lewis-Moore. He was a starter on a big-time college defense.
  13. TheFinisher

    TheFinisher Well-Known Member

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    No teams run zone or man schemes exclusively. They borrow concepts from each and may run one more than the other, but teams are not married to one scheme.

    Same thing with man or zone coverage in the secondary, everyone runs both its just some teams may run a little more of one.

    And back to Fluker not being able to play zone, Shanahan selected Trent Williams 4th overall and he was not thought of as the most nimble of lineman, yet Shanahan runs more zone than any coach in the league. There's no such thing as a "bad fit" for an olineman if he's a good player. If you're a tackle and aren't athletic enough to make the backside block on inside zone, you're useless for every team.
  14. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    I dont understand why people think Dallas intended to run a zone blocking scheme. They wanted to run a man blocking but couldnt with people they had. Heres a link to what teams ran on off and def. Hope this clears up this issue for you guys especially you supercowboy8.

    Dallas Cowboys Bill Callahan Man/Power
    http://nflsfuture.com/2012/03/28/team-by-team-offensivedefensive-schemes/

    Lewis-Moore will probably start the yr on the PUP. He wont be available for anything until earliest july.
  15. xwalker

    xwalker Well-Known Member

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    That link is wrong. Callahan has used the ZBS at his other coaching positions.

    I heard him quoted in an interview during training camp where he said "I paid for my kid's college educations teaching the Zone Blocking Scheme".

    He says he uses a mix of Zone and Man depending on the situation and players.

    Here is an article from 2009 about Callahan's ZBS with the Jets:

    Published: Thursday, December 31, 2009, 8:28 PM

    They fool you on every play, baiting the overzealous, embarrassing the overaggressive and slipping through cracks you never knew existed.
    When they do it just right, you look silly.

    The science of zone blocking may not be overly complicated, but the latest addition to the Jets playbook has put Rex Ryan’s team on the precipice of a playoff berth.

    The Jets’ top-ranked rushing attack (166.6 yards per game) has leaned on a design built on offensive linemen blocking areas rather than single defenders as running backs run parallel to the line of scrimmage before choosing a crease to slip through.

    Although the Jets used inside zone-blocking runs — running backs cutting back through open lanes inside the tackles — last season, they have added another dimension that has made all the difference.

    Offensive line coach Bill Callahan’s decision to expand the team’s zone-blocking repertoire this season with more outside zone plays — linemen running as wide as the tight end’s position on the field — has paid dividends in the past two months.

    “In the beginning of the year, we weren’t as good at it,” right guard Brandon Moore said. “We were still getting a feel for it. As we’ve gone along, it’s become our staple.”

    The evolution of outside zone runs during the season has had a tangible effect. Thomas Jones, who admittedly didn’t care for the new wrinkle early on, averaged 3.7 yards per carry in the first five games. After grasping the nuances of outside zone runs, Jones averaged 4.6 yards per carry over the next 10 games.

    “It’s a transition,” said Jones, the league’s fourth-leading rusher (1,324 yards). “Once we (practiced) it and we had some success, that’s when we started to buy into it. Now we’re a zone team.”

    The Jets’ run-heavy offense, which averages a league-high 36.7 attempts per game, is an anomaly in what has become a pass-first league. Eight of the 10 teams that have clinched a playoff spot rank in the Top 10 in passing. The Jets are 30th.

    “As an offensive lineman, it’s a way to impose your will on another team,” Moore said. “The attitude of this team is run the ball and play defense. That’s all I ever asked for. That’s a recipe for a great team.”

    Pro Bowl center Nick Mangold estimated a 50-50 split between zone-blocking and traditional man-blocking runs, but offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer has gradually increased his zone calls throughout the season.

    The primary difference with outside zone runs lies in a running back’s wider “landmark,” or ultimate destination, before a decision needs to be made.

    Offensive linemen must be even more in sync since zone designs require more combination blocks. They need to “stay on their track” to fulfill their assignment, Moore said.

    On any given play, running backs are presented with a front-side read, back-side read and “hit it right now” option that requires them to keep it simple: find immediate daylight and burst through a hole.

    According to Jones, the running back moves “sideways,” or parallel to the linemen, who flow in one direction in unison. The secret to the outside-zone style’s success is to let opponents do all the heavy lifting.

    “It’s an illusion,” said Jones, who on Sunday will face the Bengals’ second-ranked rush defense (87.7 ypg), which has allowed only four teams to top 100 yards this season. “Instead of making the defense come to where you want them to go and then blocking them, you let the defense take themselves out of the play and you react. If they over-run it, you cut back. If they stay back, you stay front side.”

    The flexibility of zone schemes allows Jones and rookie Shonn Greene to make more reads. Fullback Tony Richardson, an integral part of the Kansas City Chiefs’ dominant zone-blocking system in the first half of the decade, also helped.

    “There’s not a (pre-determined) hole where if they blitz it or stunt it, it’s closed,” Pro Bowl left guard Alan Faneca said. “The hole may be between the right guard and tackle or it could just be behind the tackle. It gives the running backs a chance to find a way.”

    The scheme also exploits “really fast flowing defenses,” said Greene, who thrived in a zone-blocking scheme at Iowa.

    “Get them running one way,” Greene said, “and then you can cut off that.”
    Callahan plucked elements from successful zone-blocking teams of the past and showed video clips to his linemen in the offseason.

    “We took little pieces from a bunch of different teams and made it into our own,” Mangold said.

    Faneca spent 10 seasons in a big gap-trap, man-blocking system in Pittsburgh before learning to block more at an angle to move guys around and create running lanes rather than simply driving through them straight on. After a brief adjustment period, the unit began to gel. So, the number of zone-blocking calls increased.

    “Once the proof was out there that we were starting to get it,” Faneca said, “that’s when the coaches opened the door a little bit and started getting a little more creative with those packages.”
  16. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    But remember this isnt Callahans offense.
  17. xwalker

    xwalker Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure if you're serious. Sometimes I misread humor.

    Jerry and Garrett both had a close relationship with Houck; however, Garrett wanted to implement more Zone Blocking into the scheme.

    Jerry talked about it in an interview in 2011. He said the Houck was having to adjust because "they" were asking him to do some things differently (i.e. more Zone Blocking concepts).

    Callahan's approach appears to be that he teaches both Zone and Man. It is then up to the play caller which type of blocking to use. They used a good bit of Zone Blocking in 2012. It appears that Callahan is going to be calling the plays and that Zone Blocking is in the playbook.

    You have an Offensive Coordinator / OLine coach that is now going to be calling the plays. Since Zone Blocking is in the playbook, he has the option to call a Zone Blocking play at any time.

    How often do you expect a play caller that is known as a Zone Blocking Guru, to choose to run a play that uses Zone Blocking?

    In regards to the "it's Garrett offense" concept, I think that a lot of that is terminology. They don't want an OC that would force the players to learn all new terminology. It appears that Callahan's playbook will be a combination of Garrett playbook with some of Callahan's West Coast offense included with the terminology all being based on Garrett's playbook.
  18. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    Well i havent found anything to say Callahan intended to run zone blocking from the get go. Just what i posted and if u search google, alot use that as reference.

    Im sure theyve ran both, but early they did use mostly man. that was the reason they went after bigger Guards then what they had last yr. Thats why they wanted Bernadeau at C because he was alot bigger than Costa. But he had that early surgery
  19. xwalker

    xwalker Well-Known Member

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    Like I said, he teaches both, but it's up to the playcaller on how often he calls it. Jason Garrett was the playcaller in 2012. It appears that Callahan will be the playcaller in 2013.

    Excerpts from the article that I posted:


    Although the Jets used inside zone-blocking runs — running backs cutting back through open lanes inside the tackles — last season, they have added another dimension that has made all the difference.

    Offensive line coach Bill Callahan’s decision to expand the team’s zone-blocking repertoire this season (Callahan's 2nd season) with more outside zone plays — linemen running as wide as the tight end’s position on the field — has paid dividends in the past two months.

    “In the beginning of the year, we weren’t as good at it,” right guard Brandon Moore said. “We were still getting a feel for it. As we’ve gone along, it’s become our staple.”

    Faneca spent 10 seasons in a big gap-trap, man-blocking system in Pittsburgh before learning to block more at an angle to move guys around and create running lanes rather than simply driving through them straight on. After a brief adjustment period, the unit began to gel. So, the number of zone-blocking calls increased.

    “Once the proof was out there that we were starting to get it,” Faneca said, “that’s when the coaches opened the door a little bit and started getting a little more creative with those packages.”

    They signed Alan Faneca the 1st year that Callahan was with the Jets. He was (6-5, 316) and had been in a man-blocking scheme his entire career. It is obvious from the article that Callahan intended to implement the ZBS with the Jets, but phased it in slowly the 1st year.

    Bernadeau:
    In regards, to Bernadeau being bigger than Costa, it is not true that big players can't play in the ZBS. It just depends on the quickness of the player.

    The Texans drafted Brandon Brooks (6-5, 340) for their ZBS.

    Here is an excerpt from an article where Kubiak references this issue:

    Kubiak disagreed with the notion Brooks doesn’t fit the mold of a zone blocker “because he can move. If he was 350 and just a big, powerful guy, that would be different. But he moves around well and he can bend. He’s a new-wave kind of kid. They’re making them a little bigger nowadays. I think he’s got a real good chance of being able to help us.”
  20. LatinMind

    LatinMind iPhotoshop

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    yes but its still JGs team. Its clear this team has players already thats better fit for a man blocking scheme. Especially if they keep Livings and Bernadeau at G. They just confuse themselves on stunts with that zone blocking. Its not a fit for Dallas.

    Broaddus speaks about this all the time. He says you do your team a disservice by forcing your system on a team instead of going with a system that fits your players. a nd the way Jerry was talking about Livings and Mack i think theres more of a possibility of them starting in 2013 as Guards.

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