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Well done Google....

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by JBond, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    [IMG]

    The pic is from google earth. Isn't the head of Google a close advisor to Obama. Is this a good idea?
  2. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    They should be brought up on charges.
  3. DaBoys4Life

    DaBoys4Life Benched

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    how did someone find it? whoever found it should be charged. This should be considered treason.
  4. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Did you purposely omit, or did you not know, that those pics were from 2006?
  5. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    I think Google Earth should have dead zones that are a matter of National Security.

    Google Earth is the problem ....... hopefully they are shut down soon.
  6. WoodysGirl

    WoodysGirl Shut up and play! Staff Member

    66,654 Messages
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    The United States has been using a base in Pakistan to station unmanned Predator drones that have been used to attack terrorist targets inside the country's tribal areas, a senior U.S. official told FOX News Thursday.

    The confirmation contradicts a stream of previous denials from officials and comes after the Times of London published a Google Earth image apparently showing three U.S. drones at the Shamsi airbase in Pakistan's southwestern province of Baluchistan as early as 2006.

    The image -- which is no longer on the site but was obtained by The News, Pakistan's English language daily newspaper -- shows what appear to be three Predator drones outside a hangar at the end of the runway.

    The senior U.S. official told FOX News that the U.S. was in fact launching Predator UAV strikes from at least one base in Pakistan, confirming a statement made by U.S. Senate intelligence committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein last week. The California Democrat riled intelligence circles when she seemed to reveal sensitive information about such a Pakistan-based staging ground during a hearing. The official said that slip led to the initial denials from other officials that the U.S. was using Pakistani bases.

    The Times also obtained a copy of the Google Earth image, whose coordinates confirm that it is the Shamsi airfield, also known as Bandari, about 200 miles southwest of the Pakistani city of Quetta.

    The Times reported that the CIA was secretly using Shamsi to launch the Predator drones that observe and attack Al Qaeda and Taliban militants around Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

    U.S. special forces used the airbase during the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, but the Pakistani Government said in 2006 that the Americans had left and both sides have since denied repeatedly that Washington was using Pakistani bases.

    Two senior U.S. defense officials had previously told FOX News that no Predator unmanned aerial vehicles are or have recently been based in Pakistani territory, despite Feinstein's statement. However, they could use the Shamsi air base if they needed to. The base is well known to the U.S. military and was used by the Americans in 2001 and 2002 at the beginning of the war in Afghanistan.

    One U.S. official told FOX News the U.S. has been flying "Predators or UAVs" in Pakistan since 2002.

    There have been 30 strikes since August with 11 top leaders of Al Qaeda taken out, according to intelligence reports.

    Senior officials also confirm that Pakistan has been aiding the U.S. in its Predator unmanned aerial vehicle strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas, despite its leaders' very public protests that they see the strikes as a breach of sovereignty.

    Both President Asif Ali Zardari and General Ashraf Kayani, the head of Pakistan's army, have turned a blind eye to the strikes. According to the officials, these two leaders have launched no protests behind the scenes to U.S. officials about the strikes.

    Any public protests have been for public consumption inside Pakistan. One official, however, says that not all elements of the Pakistani government are aware of this cooperation or support it -- suggesting other civilian leaders may not be onboard.

    FOX News' Jennifer Griffin and Justin Fishel contributed to this report.

    The United States has been using a base in Pakistan to station unmanned Predator drones that have been used to attack terrorist targets inside the country's tribal areas, a senior U.S. official told FOX News Thursday.

    The confirmation contradicts a stream of previous denials from officials and comes after the Times of London published a Google Earth image apparently showing three U.S. drones at the Shamsi airbase in Pakistan's southwestern province of Baluchistan as early as 2006.

    The image -- which is no longer on the site but was obtained by The News, Pakistan's English language daily newspaper -- shows what appear to be three Predator drones outside a hangar at the end of the runway.

    The senior U.S. official told FOX News that the U.S. was in fact launching Predator UAV strikes from at least one base in Pakistan, confirming a statement made by U.S. Senate intelligence committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein last week. The California Democrat riled intelligence circles when she seemed to reveal sensitive information about such a Pakistan-based staging ground during a hearing. The official said that slip led to the initial denials from other officials that the U.S. was using Pakistani bases.

    The Times also obtained a copy of the Google Earth image, whose coordinates confirm that it is the Shamsi airfield, also known as Bandari, about 200 miles southwest of the Pakistani city of Quetta.

    The Times reported that the CIA was secretly using Shamsi to launch the Predator drones that observe and attack Al Qaeda and Taliban militants around Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

    U.S. special forces used the airbase during the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, but the Pakistani Government said in 2006 that the Americans had left and both sides have since denied repeatedly that Washington was using Pakistani bases.

    Two senior U.S. defense officials had previously told FOX News that no Predator unmanned aerial vehicles are or have recently been based in Pakistani territory, despite Feinstein's statement. However, they could use the Shamsi air base if they needed to. The base is well known to the U.S. military and was used by the Americans in 2001 and 2002 at the beginning of the war in Afghanistan.

    One U.S. official told FOX News the U.S. has been flying "Predators or UAVs" in Pakistan since 2002.

    There have been 30 strikes since August with 11 top leaders of Al Qaeda taken out, according to intelligence reports.

    Senior officials also confirm that Pakistan has been aiding the U.S. in its Predator unmanned aerial vehicle strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas, despite its leaders' very public protests that they see the strikes as a breach of sovereignty.

    Both President Asif Ali Zardari and General Ashraf Kayani, the head of Pakistan's army, have turned a blind eye to the strikes. According to the officials, these two leaders have launched no protests behind the scenes to U.S. officials about the strikes.

    Any public protests have been for public consumption inside Pakistan. One official, however, says that not all elements of the Pakistani government are aware of this cooperation or support it -- suggesting other civilian leaders may not be onboard.

    FOX News' Jennifer Griffin and Justin Fishel contributed to this report.

    The United States has been using a base in Pakistan to station unmanned Predator drones that have been used to attack terrorist targets inside the country's tribal areas, a senior U.S. official told FOX News Thursday.

    The confirmation contradicts a stream of previous denials from officials and comes after the Times of London published a Google Earth image apparently showing three U.S. drones at the Shamsi airbase in Pakistan's southwestern province of Baluchistan as early as 2006.

    The image -- which is no longer on the site but was obtained by The News, Pakistan's English language daily newspaper -- shows what appear to be three Predator drones outside a hangar at the end of the runway.

    The senior U.S. official told FOX News that the U.S. was in fact launching Predator UAV strikes from at least one base in Pakistan, confirming a statement made by U.S. Senate intelligence committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein last week. The California Democrat riled intelligence circles when she seemed to reveal sensitive information about such a Pakistan-based staging ground during a hearing. The official said that slip led to the initial denials from other officials that the U.S. was using Pakistani bases.

    The Times also obtained a copy of the Google Earth image, whose coordinates confirm that it is the Shamsi airfield, also known as Bandari, about 200 miles southwest of the Pakistani city of Quetta.

    The Times reported that the CIA was secretly using Shamsi to launch the Predator drones that observe and attack Al Qaeda and Taliban militants around Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

    U.S. special forces used the airbase during the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, but the Pakistani Government said in 2006 that the Americans had left and both sides have since denied repeatedly that Washington was using Pakistani bases.

    Two senior U.S. defense officials had previously told FOX News that no Predator unmanned aerial vehicles are or have recently been based in Pakistani territory, despite Feinstein's statement. However, they could use the Shamsi air base if they needed to. The base is well known to the U.S. military and was used by the Americans in 2001 and 2002 at the beginning of the war in Afghanistan.

    One U.S. official told FOX News the U.S. has been flying "Predators or UAVs" in Pakistan since 2002.

    There have been 30 strikes since August with 11 top leaders of Al Qaeda taken out, according to intelligence reports.

    Senior officials also confirm that Pakistan has been aiding the U.S. in its Predator unmanned aerial vehicle strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas, despite its leaders' very public protests that they see the strikes as a breach of sovereignty.

    Both President Asif Ali Zardari and General Ashraf Kayani, the head of Pakistan's army, have turned a blind eye to the strikes. According to the officials, these two leaders have launched no protests behind the scenes to U.S. officials about the strikes.

    Any public protests have been for public consumption inside Pakistan. One official, however, says that not all elements of the Pakistani government are aware of this cooperation or support it -- suggesting other civilian leaders may not be onboard.

    FOX News' Jennifer Griffin and Justin Fishel contributed to this report.

    The United States has been using a base in Pakistan to station unmanned Predator drones that have been used to attack terrorist targets inside the country's tribal areas, a senior U.S. official told FOX News Thursday.

    The confirmation contradicts a stream of previous denials from officials and comes after the Times of London published a Google Earth image apparently showing three U.S. drones at the Shamsi airbase in Pakistan's southwestern province of Baluchistan as early as 2006.

    The image -- which is no longer on the site but was obtained by The News, Pakistan's English language daily newspaper -- shows what appear to be three Predator drones outside a hangar at the end of the runway.

    The senior U.S. official told FOX News that the U.S. was in fact launching Predator UAV strikes from at least one base in Pakistan, confirming a statement made by U.S. Senate intelligence committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein last week. The California Democrat riled intelligence circles when she seemed to reveal sensitive information about such a Pakistan-based staging ground during a hearing. The official said that slip led to the initial denials from other officials that the U.S. was using Pakistani bases.

    The Times also obtained a copy of the Google Earth image, whose coordinates confirm that it is the Shamsi airfield, also known as Bandari, about 200 miles southwest of the Pakistani city of Quetta.

    The Times reported that the CIA was secretly using Shamsi to launch the Predator drones that observe and attack Al Qaeda and Taliban militants around Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

    U.S. special forces used the airbase during the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, but the Pakistani Government said in 2006 that the Americans had left and both sides have since denied repeatedly that Washington was using Pakistani bases.

    Two senior U.S. defense officials had previously told FOX News that no Predator unmanned aerial vehicles are or have recently been based in Pakistani territory, despite Feinstein's statement. However, they could use the Shamsi air base if they needed to. The base is well known to the U.S. military and was used by the Americans in 2001 and 2002 at the beginning of the war in Afghanistan.

    One U.S. official told FOX News the U.S. has been flying "Predators or UAVs" in Pakistan since 2002.

    There have been 30 strikes since August with 11 top leaders of Al Qaeda taken out, according to intelligence reports.

    Senior officials also confirm that Pakistan has been aiding the U.S. in its Predator unmanned aerial vehicle strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas, despite its leaders' very public protests that they see the strikes as a breach of sovereignty.

    Both President Asif Ali Zardari and General Ashraf Kayani, the head of Pakistan's army, have turned a blind eye to the strikes. According to the officials, these two leaders have launched no protests behind the scenes to U.S. officials about the strikes.

    Any public protests have been for public consumption inside Pakistan. One official, however, says that not all elements of the Pakistani government are aware of this cooperation or support it -- suggesting other civilian leaders may not be onboard.

    FOX News' Jennifer Griffin and Justin Fishel contributed to this report.

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/elections/2009/02/19/google-image-shows-base-pakistan/
  7. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    I saw the pic on the cover of the FOX news web page. I had never seen the pic before. If you have some more info, please share.

    Do you consider this a responsible and reasonable thing for Google to do?
  8. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    How would they know it is a dead zone though?

    Someone would have to know the coordinates to type in to get that specific picture. Who knew those coordinates and looked them up is the one they should go after.

    Also I don't know if you are suggesting that google earth be told that Pakistan, and whole other countries, are to be removed or if you are suggesting the government should give certain coordinates to google earth to restrict.

    I don't think google earth should be charged or thought badly of if they were never given any specific coordinates to ban in their software. It would seem that would fall on the government or the user putting in the coordinates.

    Just something to think about.
  9. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Next time it might help to read the article. Not ripping on you but it does state the date of 2006.

    Also read my other post concerning if it is google earths fault or not.

    One could argue that you might consider going after news agencies that have posted that picture in the past or even now as being more a problem than going after google earth.
  10. DIAF

    DIAF DivaLover159

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    I don't know if there's anything you can do about this sort of thing now. I'll be willing to bet there are images of predators taken by other geomapping services as well, not just google earth.

    If you tell google (or whoever) that there are dead zones they cannot show, they are going to know something is out there they shouldnt be seeing. That info will get out, and people will put 2+2 together. I think this is just a reality we all have to live with.
  11. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    You are probably right about someone from the Government dropping the ball.

    My first reaction is anger that any Military personnel could be put in danger by the exposing of Military information.

    But there needs to be places that Google Earth cannot look into. I find it hard to believe that there are not.
  12. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    There probably are places they have been asked to not show. If I recall the VP's office/home in DC was one of those. Remember a recent article that they removed the pixelation or banning of that image once biden took office.

    So there are some things they have been asked to not allow to be shown and have cooperated with and I would imagine there are more.

    However I would also say that I doubt the government has given them secret locations of predator drones on their do not allow to be shown list.
  13. JBond

    JBond Well-Known Member

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    I would like to know who leaked the coordinates. Or maybe some Pakistani was taking his heroine to market on his pack mule and just stumbled across it. Hard to say for sure. If there was anyone in our government involved in any way they should face some sort of charges in my opinion.
  14. sbark

    sbark Well-Known Member Zone Supporter

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    Google Earth isnt the only concern. there are a myriad of software programs that can lay out 3-d topography maps of terrian---

    Maptech Terrain Navigator Pro: www.maptech.mytopo.com

    DeLorme Topo USA 7.0 ---can actually depict flying over topography via plane www.delorme.com
    www.delorme.com/flyover

    These probably are USA only......but for 100.00 bucks....even Osama can afford that.....
  15. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    Agreed...I would like to know if someone just stumbled upon it or if someone in the government leaked the info.

    It would seem, from the article, that the london times was the first to bring this out though and I don't know if someone from our government would tip them off instead of tipping off an american paper like NY Times.
  16. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

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    so you find what you're looking for or you find a blur. then you mark blurs and look on your own. wala, still found. no, google earth should not be shut down. if it's a secret base how did "google" know it was there? they're just flying over the earth taking pics for their site for "normal" use.

    what if a russian sat takes the pics - they can see it too. we should cover it up a bit better knowing there are eyes up there. also, did google find it and go HEY EVERYONE SUPER SECRET BASE HERE!!!

    or was someone else looking around ON google and they found it and released it?
  17. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

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    holy schneike batman, bp and i agree on something!!!
  18. sbark

    sbark Well-Known Member Zone Supporter

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    ......First we better tell Senator, Senate Intelligence head (oxymoron) Diane Fienstien....

    once she blurbed out the fact Predators were using Pakistani bases....I'm sure the hunt was on by thousands of computer hacks worldwide...

    what better challenge for those guys.....
  19. iceberg

    iceberg detoxed Zone Supporter

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    look, if we don't want our drones seen, park them in the hanger! and then if the hacks found it, why is that googles fault? people seem to be quick to be angry but logical thought isn't following it.

    it's like the right now bullet hunting for anything they can shoot hte left with and the game continues from the other side of the field now.
  20. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

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    We both agree we are long haired sexy SOBs. :D

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