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Working Out...Time Of Day/Motivation

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by Stryker44, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. ChldsPlay

    ChldsPlay Well-Known Member

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    I always found I had more energy to get through a workout in the morning than in the evening, and often had longer workouts because of it. But, rarely do I get exercise only once a day, so it's hard to say. I like to spread it out if I can.
  2. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    For me personally, I like working out first thing in the morning. I do it 6 days a week for 50-60 minutes each day. I work out alone because I bike ride 4 days, run 1 day and lift 1 day. You have to stay consistent and make it a life change. As we all know, there's no shortcuts to fitness. It's a lifestyle. The benefits far, far outweigh the couple of months it takes for it to become a lifestyle change. Your Dr. will give you mucho compliments after he sees your blood work results.
  3. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    Cardio is much better for fitness than lifting. You need to do both but way more cardio unless you just like to show off your pecs.
  4. Future

    Future Intramural Legend

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    Yea, in terms of cardio, but it doesn't really do anything to build muscle.

    One thing that always bugs me, is when people think they are great athletes just because they run a lot.
    BigStar likes this.
  5. Kristen82

    Kristen82 Benched

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    Yeah, marathoners and ultra-marathoners aren't great athletes :rolleyes:...running 26 miles = who gives a sh_t?
  6. Future

    Future Intramural Legend

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    Not saying it isn't impressive, but you don't have to be a great athlete to be in great shape. I stand by what i said...
    BigStar likes this.
  7. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    Yea, that bugs me too. WTH?
  8. Kristen82

    Kristen82 Benched

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    Well, speaking as someone who's into muscly guys, I beg to differ.

    The heart is a muscle just as the bicep is, and the amount of stress it incurs as well as the other muscles being used during the run over the course of say a non-world class but still respectable marathon time of 2.5 hours is quite severe. The issues of free radical generation and oxidative stress on cellular constituents are hardly exclusive to the domain of strength training. Also, increasing thresholds through "training to failure" and "progressive overloading" is as much a part of endurance training as it is strength training.

    If you view increasing endurance as less of an accomplishment than increasing muscle mass is, I'd suggest you try running a marathon. You'll find you need to exert and maintain as much if not more physical and mental discipline than you would in high-intensity heavy-weight low-rep strength training. Not to mention strength training is actually an essential part of a distance runner's training regimen. The core muscles (transversus abdominis, erector spinae etc.) for example are essential in keeping the runner in an upright stance to maintain optimal lung capacity. Not to mention I've never heard of anyone puking from hyponatremia after an hour session of weight-training like I did after my first marathon. Anyways, if you think distance runners are sissies, you're entitled to your opinion but I respectfully disagree for the reasons I mentioned.
  9. Stryker44

    Stryker44 Active Member

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    I think by "great athlete" he means someone that's a freak based on genetics (eg tall, fast, explosive) that could translate their abilities to a great number of sports/athletic endeavors and still do well based on their natural genetic makeup versus someone who trains and works out hard to get themselves in great shape, yet would be outperformed in a competition by someone with more talent.
    BigStar and Future like this.
  10. Stryker44

    Stryker44 Active Member

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    Adrian Peterson and Calvin Johnson are obvious examples in the NFL though one could argue that the competition to get to that level is so fierce that everyone at that level is a "great athlete".

    They aren't in as great of shape cardio-wise as a world-class marathon runner from Kenya, but then we'd have to get into all the factors that comprise physical fitness like strength, power, flexibility, balance, mental preparation, recovery, etc...
  11. Future

    Future Intramural Legend

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    I dont think that building muscle makes you a great athlete either. I know guys who can run marathons or lift the world and are just crappy athletes.

    Essentially, I dont think strong/fit = athletic.
    BigStar likes this.
  12. CATCH17

    CATCH17 1st Round Pick

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    Just got done with a 530 AM squat session. Gotta say I like the evening workouts better. It's also the last workout I do for the week so im probably just exhausted.


    Also I don't get this exerciser vs athlete debate.
  13. Kristen82

    Kristen82 Benched

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    When you put it that way, it makes sense.
  14. Kristen82

    Kristen82 Benched

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    There is no good or bad time to exercise really. Just a matter of personal preference based on convenience.
    Seven likes this.
  15. Denim Chicken

    Denim Chicken Well-Known Member

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  16. CATCH17

    CATCH17 1st Round Pick

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    So if I come up to you all skinny and hit on you and say that I have a muscled up heart will it work?
    Carl23 likes this.
  17. Teren_Kanan

    Teren_Kanan Well-Known Member

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    I started working out 4 months ago. 4 days a week without fail.

    I'm 29, 275 pounds and 6 foot 4.

    I've "started" going to the gym several times in my life, all failures. The longest streak was about 5 months of consistent working out at a gym when I was out of a job. I'd never consistently gone to a gym while I had a job because I refused to find the time/motivation (Key word "refused to find" as opposed to "couldn't find) to do so. Every time I started working out I felt so bogged down in information and goals. There is SO MUCH information to be found on getting in shape/working out that it can be daunting. So many guides have you set all sorts of goals for yourself etc, and all sorts of information to digest. How to work out, when to work out, how long to work out, what to eat, when to eat, yadda yadda. Found myself setting 1000 rules for myself, impossible to follow them all, which can be very discouraging. I'd develop the mindset of "if I can't do all these things right, why bother doing any of it". My "Goal" all these times, was getting in shape.

    Trying the same thing and expecting different results is the definition of insanity eh?

    I've decided to start going to the Gym with a different mindset this time. I'm not trying to get in shape, I'm not trying to build muscle or lose weight. I'm simply trying to make going to the Gym a part of my life. Not something I stop doing when I reach whatever physical goals I might make, not something I do to "get in shape" necessarily, but just make it something that I do 3 to 4 times a week, preferably for the rest of my life. Instead of setting all sorts of goals that can be frustrating to keep up with, I simply went in with the goal of getting sweaty and out of breath while spending about an hour at the gym several times a week. I figured the physical results I might desire would happen more or less gradually over time.

    I went back over all the times I started going to the gym before and really tried to pin down what always made me stop, and how I could avoid that wall this time. What it really came down to was laziness when it came to actually GOING to the gym. Once I was there, I always worked out just fine, but it was the getting dressed, getting my stuff in the car and actually GOING that was the roadblock. So my first goal was to figure out how to battle this laziness, as I didn't trust myself to simply "not be lazy this time".

    I work 30 minutes away from where I live. Graveyard shift. I get off between 4am and 6am. I found a nice 24 hour Gym right by where I work, just off of a road I take on my drive home. It is SO much easier to go to the gym when I'm already out of the house, especially when it's already in the direction I have to go anyways. It's completely crushed the motivation factor of making myself leave the house. It's also helped me be more tired when I get home, which helps me sleep through the day light.

    When I started going, I was more or less lost. So many machines, I barely knew how to use them all. I didn't really know a lot in terms of work outs, what I should do on the same days etc. So I decided to start with something simple, and something I absolutely hated and never really got into any of the other times I started working out. Jogging. I begin every work out with a jog on the treadmill now. On the first day I simply set out to see how long I could jog before I felt like I was going to die. At my size, and as out of shape as I am, jogging pretty much feels like I'm dying. Day 1 I lasted 7 minutes and 48 seconds before I had to stop, at 4mph.I made my day 2 goal 7 minutes and 49 seconds, easy as it gets. Baby steps right? By the end of the second month, I was doing 20 minutes at 5mph. After my jogs, i would lift weights.

    Since I started, I've taken in a lot of information. Mainly that exhausting your body by jogging isn't something you should do before working out. So now before every work out, I simply jog 5 minutes at 6mph. This gets me just to the point of starting to sweat, and warms my body up for the workout. Once a week on my day 4, I will jog 20+ minutes on the treadmill. It's more or less my cardio/core day now.

    As for physical goals, I honestly haven't set any beyond "lose some weight" and "build some muscle". Very loose goals that aren't too daunting, and much harder to "fail" than setting exact weight to be, or some exact weight you want to be able to lift by some deadline you create. I haven't weighed myself since I started, and I'm not going to for at least another 2 months (Original membership was 6mo). I don't expect a large amount of weight loss, as I have not began the "Diet" part of getting in shape yet, but I have VERY noticeable muscle gains at this point, which helps motivate me.

    I've made going to the gym a learning experience. Instead of trying to pack in all the information before I begin, I simply began and slowly started pulling more and more information in. When I see a personal trainer with someone I watch them, and try to listen to what they say. I've copied/stolen so many techniques that I've added to my work outs. I started going to youtube and picking up a new set of reps here and there for various muscle groups. There is an amazing amount of visual help on youtube that has really helped me and my technique.

    My brain still tells me every day that "This is going to suck", right before I actually go to the gym, but it no longer questions whether or not I'm going to actually GO. It's just something I do after work at this point. Imo, the hard part is over. All that remains is consistency, and improving my techniques and routines. Well, that and the diet part, which I imagine will be about 10x harder than going to the gym is, but I'm not going to tackle that until after the holidays!

    Anyhow, that's my workout story, and how I have made the gym a part of my life (so far). It's not like anything you'll read in any of the information out there, but it's really helped me out. And as for when to work out, and how to work out.. Until you are at an advanced level in your routines, just keep it simple. If you are going to the gym, getting sweaty, breathing heavy, and your muscles are sore the day after, you're going to see gains. Start there, and take the rest in slowly, improving your routine over time. Starting out trying to keep up with all the information/advice you read is just too much imo.
  18. CATCH17

    CATCH17 1st Round Pick

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    I think this is the majority of peoples problem. It never goes away either but eventually it just won't stop you.
  19. Stryker44

    Stryker44 Active Member

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    Weekends are tough motivation wise because sometimes I just want to stay around the house and relax. However I ate alot better this weekend, did a ton of pushups on both Saturday and Sunday, plank/core exercises and didn't drink, so feel like it won't be a disappointment when I weigh in at the gym tonight.
  20. CATCH17

    CATCH17 1st Round Pick

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    If you don't want to workout on the weekends then don't do it. It's not going to make or break you. Just get it done 3 or 4 times a week, sleep good, and eat right.

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