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another case of animal cruelty

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by Bob Sacamano, Jul 8, 2009.

  1. Bob Sacamano

    Bob Sacamano Benched

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    A couple in my county were taking care of a lady's boxer, when they called her and told her that they couldn't hold it anymore, and needed her to pick it up, so she says she would be there in an hour or two to do so

    apparently the couple couldn't wait forever, took the dog into a park and shot it to death

    I will never understand
  2. Faerluna

    Faerluna I'm Complicated

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  3. ROMOSAPIEN9

    ROMOSAPIEN9 Proud Grandpa

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    There has got to be alot more to that story.
  4. Sam I Am

    Sam I Am Unfriendly and Aloof!

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    Our abuse of you could be considered animal cruelty. :laugh2:
  5. DIAF

    DIAF DivaLover159

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    Whoa. Shot them 11 times with a gun fitted with a HOMEMADE SILENCER? This guy is a nut.
  6. jackrussell

    jackrussell Last of the Duke Street Kings

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    Euclid woman, 75, accused of beating fawn to death


    The Associated Press
    Posted Jul 08, 2009 @ 10:54 AM
    Last update Jul 08, 2009 @ 04:15 PM
    EUCLID —
    A woman is accused ofbeating a fawn to death with a shovel after finding it in a flower garden at her home near a wooded park.

    Seventy-five-year-old Dorothy Richardson has been charged in a warrant with animal cruelty on June 15 at her Euclid home near the Cleveland Metroparks Euclid Creek Reservation. Euclid animal control officer Ann Mills requested the warrant.

    Richardson has not yet appeared in court. She tells WKYC-TV in Cleveland she was afraid of the fawn and used a shovel to try to make it move. She says that, after it died, she put it in a box and took it to the curb on trash day. A telephone message was left for her Wednesday by The Associated Press.

    Euclid’s cruelty to animals charge is punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.
  7. Bob Sacamano

    Bob Sacamano Benched

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    another reason why old people should be put in homes
  8. DallasEast

    DallasEast Cowboys 24/7/365 Zone Supporter

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    So, you're saying that once you hit 40, you're going straight into a home, right? :rolleyes: ;)
  9. Bob Sacamano

    Bob Sacamano Benched

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    no, I'm saying I'm putting you in a home in the next few years
  10. Jon88

    Jon88 Benched

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    I would pay $50 to crack that woman with a shovel.
  11. Sam I Am

    Sam I Am Unfriendly and Aloof!

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    I prefer the idea behind Logan's Run better. :laugh2:
  12. ROMOSAPIEN9

    ROMOSAPIEN9 Proud Grandpa

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    I woulda paid $20 to get a whack at the fawn with the shovel. There's no doubt I could do a lot more damage than an old lady.


    :horse: <---fawn
  13. vta

    vta The Proletariat

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    Sounds kind of weird. Why were they taking care of her boxer if she could come and get in that time period? Not that the ***** are right for doing what they did, but she might just be as responsible for abandoning her dog.
  14. Jon88

    Jon88 Benched

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    That is just hilarious.
  15. vta

    vta The Proletariat

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    Bring it on...

    [IMG]
  16. ROMOSAPIEN9

    ROMOSAPIEN9 Proud Grandpa

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    Here's my shovel....

    [IMG]

    Consider it brung!!

    :D
  17. vta

    vta The Proletariat

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    :lmao:

    You win.
  18. bbgun

    bbgun Benched

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    Raids in 6 states show dogfighting is widespread

    By CHERYL WITTENAUER, Associated Press Writer Cheryl Wittenauer, Associated Press Writer &#8211; 1 hr 49 mins ago


    ST. LOUIS &#8211; The arrests this week of a Little League coach, a registered nurse and a teacher during the largest coordinated raids on dogfighting in U.S. history confirm the shadowy blood sport is alive and well despite tough laws across the country.

    More than 400 dogs, including some about to give birth to puppies, were rescued in the raids by federal, state and local authorities Wednesday and Thursday in six states: Missouri, Illinois, Texas, Oklahoma, Iowa and Mississippi, officials said.

    U.S. attorneys in several states accused 26 people of cruelties that included shooting dogs in the head when they didn't fight well, then throwing their carcasses into a river or burning them in a barrel.

    The sport, often carried out in back alley garages or rural barns, has come under renewed scrutiny after NFL star Michael Vick was sentenced to prison after his 2007 dogfighting conviction. Dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states, and in recent years, the federal government made it a felony to train, possess or fight dogs.

    But that hasn't stopped people from participating in the sport. Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said the public can "definitely expect more" arrests and raids, because "dogfighting remains a distressingly widespread activity."

    During raids on Wednesday in Texas, federal authorities seized nine pit bulls in rural Panola County and charged nine people, including a 34-year-old Little League coach, with involvement in an interstate dogfighting ring.

    Karl Courtney, of the eastern Texas town of Beckville pleaded not guilty, said his attorney David Moore, who described his client as a "well-respected business owner." His brother, Chase Courtney, 26, of the nearby town of Carthage, also was arrested, but a phone number or attorney for him could not be found.

    Cris Bottcher, a 48-year-old registered nurse at a community hospital in Bethany, Mo., also was arrested Wednesday in western Missouri and accused of shooting underperforming dogs and putting their carcasses in plastic containers outside a garage, according to a federal indictment.

    Six others were also arrested in that raid including Rick Hihath, a 55-year-old physical education teacher at a state school for the severely disabled, the indictment said. He is accused of working and promoting fights at Bottcher's farm, it said.

    The Missouri men were due in court Friday, said Don Ledford, a spokesman at the U.S. Attorney's office in Kansas City, Mo. Their court-appointed attorneys did not return phone calls, and people who answered the phones at their homes declined to comment.

    Randall Lockwood, an animal behaviorist working with some of the dogs in a St. Louis shelter, said the arrests illustrate dogfighting's prevalence.

    "It's a very long battle and the battle will continue as long as people cause suffering and death for financial gain and amusement," said Lockwood, of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

    Authorities are closely guarding the condition of the rescued dogs because of the pending criminal trials. The Humane Society of Missouri said it is housing most of them at its emergency shelter in St. Louis. Groups in Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Iowa are taking care of another 75 to 100 dogs, the Missouri group said.

    "We're seeing a lot of tail wags," said Janell Matthies with United Animal Nations, a California nonprofit rescue group assisting in the dogs' medical triage.

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