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Hybrid sharks

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by joseephuss, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. joseephuss

    joseephuss Well-Known Member

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    http://news.yahoo.com/world-first-hybrid-shark-found-off-australia-070347608.html

    World-first hybrid shark found off Australia

    Scientists said on Tuesday that they had discovered the world's first hybrid sharks in Australian waters, a potential sign the predators were adapting to cope with climate change.

    The mating of the local Australian black-tip shark with its global counterpart, the common black-tip, was an unprecedented discovery with implications for the entire shark world, said lead researcher Jess Morgan.

    "It's very surprising because no one's ever seen shark hybrids before, this is not a common occurrence by any stretch of the imagination," Morgan, from the University of Queensland, told AFP.

    "This is evolution in action."

    Colin Simpfendorfer, a partner in Morgan's research from James Cook University, said initial studies suggested the hybrid species was relatively robust, with a number of generations discovered across 57 specimens.

    The find was made during cataloguing work off Australia's east coast when Morgan said genetic testing showed certain sharks to be one species when physically they looked to be another.

    The Australian black-tip is slightly smaller than its common cousin and can only live in tropical waters, but its hybrid offspring have been found 2,000 kilometres down the coast, in cooler seas.

    It means the Australian black-tip could be adapting to ensure its survival as sea temperatures change because of global warming.

    "If it hybridises with the common species it can effectively shift its range further south into cooler waters, so the effect of this hybridising is a range expansion," Morgan said.
  2. StevenOtero

    StevenOtero Well-Known Member

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    We're gonna need a bigger boat.
  3. CowboyMcCoy

    CowboyMcCoy Business is a Boomin

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    Very cool read.
  4. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Backwoods Sexy Staff Member

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    When we get sharks with laser beams on their heads...then I will be impressed. :p:
  5. big dog cowboy

    big dog cowboy THE BIG DOG Staff Member

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    :laugh2:

    Priceless.
  6. TheDallasDon

    TheDallasDon AegonTheConqueror-Now bend the knee

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    Ohhh so that's how we got tiger sharks:cool:
  7. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

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    I really detest articles like this because they are so damn misleading.

    Adapting to cope with climate change?????? The common blacktip shark happens to be the one I focused on in my first independent research project as an undergrad.

    Sharks aren't 'adapting to cope'. They're breeding with another species that has almost the exact physiological, biochemical, and life history characteristics as itself. In fact, we didn't even know about the Australian or South African Blacktips as separate populations until genetic sequencing got affordable in the mid-90's, some PhD got a big old fat NSF grant, and started globe trotting the world on a 'find and grind' expedition.

    Shark research and public information is so far apart, it's quite laughable. I would bet $50 that no one can tell me the largest predatory shark in the world without hopping on Google.

    Funny thing, most books reference there being 370-385 shark species in the world. Well, that's been the stated number for years because every damn book references the other. The last count I did on published papers showed about 417 distinct species in 1997. FWIW, I had more than ten 3" binders worth of published shark research I printed out to get up to speed on things as an undergrad.

    Random useless information, we know that lemon shark females not only give birth past 65 years of age, but also shrink as they get older. Oldest one on record as best I can remember was over 85 years old, for that species, N. brevirostris.
  8. TheDallasDon

    TheDallasDon AegonTheConqueror-Now bend the knee

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    Salt you sound like the guy to ask.......my friend told me that they are finding out that bulls aren't the only shark that can survive in fresh water, is he right?
  9. Muhast

    Muhast Newo

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    The great white is the largest predatory. Whale shark ie the biggest.
    Tiger shark is 2nd biggest predatory shark. I think everyone knows that due to shark week lol
  10. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

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    Last I knew, there were five or 6 species that could survive for extended time in fresh water. The Lake Nicaragua shark has been both declared to be it's own species and then lumped back into the lump as a regular bull shark so that's not included in the 5 or 6.

    That's of course excluding any of the skates and rays that are obligate aquatic species.

    There's also a grey area for neonates as many species pup in estuarine waters and their offspring may live there for several months before undergoing a physiological change in their bodies that put them in osmotic stress that drives them to find saltier water.

    Another random useless fact, some shark species are so in tune with the the polarity of the Earth's magnetic field, running a cable across the bottom of a shallow inlet will cause them to reverse direction as you flip the electrical signal through the cable. What's truly impressive about that is that the same electricity that would kill you if you were standing in freshwater would give you only a tickle in saltwater like putting your tongue to the leads of a small 9 volt battery. The free ion concentration in saltwater is of sufficient quantity to diffuse deadly electrical currents. Therefore, an electrical field in saltwater is exceedingly weak, yet shark species can read it as readily as your or I read a GPS.

    And the whole "they can smell a drop of blood from a mile away" thing that gets repeated ad nauseum? Complete crap. They can differentiate chemical compositions in saltwater down to about 1 ppm, and that's where the blood in the water myth comes from.
  11. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

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    White shark is the second biggest. Pacific sleeper is the largest predatory. Somniosus pacificus doesn't get as much press because it doesn't eat surfers. They get the name "sleeper" shark because their nictitating membrane closes when they're dead so they appear to have closed their eyes.

    Here's a shot of a 9' tiger I took with a disposable underwater camera while working in Bimini at U of Miami's field station there.

    [IMG]
  12. TheDallasDon

    TheDallasDon AegonTheConqueror-Now bend the knee

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    I thought the Greenland was or could be the biggest?

    Edit: its in the sleeper family also right?
  13. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

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    Yep, same family.

    The Pacific has a slightly larger overall average size, and there's one on record as being over 27' in literature. Not sure why Wiki doesnt' have it right.
  14. TheDallasDon

    TheDallasDon AegonTheConqueror-Now bend the knee

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    Oddly enough I never heard of the Greenland shark until I saw Bizarre Foods lol
  15. Kangaroo

    Kangaroo Active Member

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    I doubt this is new because Sharks have been around for a long time adapting to the changes in the Ocean before Mankind and global warming and cooling that happened before we ever knew what to do with oil or coal :rolleyes:
  16. SaltwaterServr

    SaltwaterServr Blank Paper Offends Me

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    Sharks have been around since before the organisms that died and decomposed to become that oil and coal. So there's that.
  17. trickblue

    trickblue Old Testament...

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    Ding Ding Ding...

    If this was truly the definition of a hybrid species, then we could all go down to the pound and bring a hybrid dog/cat home today...

    What this shark is, is a mutt... and he ain't the first one...

    I have no problem with animals evolving, we all do, but to tie it to "Global Warming" is QUITE the stretch...
  18. trickblue

    trickblue Old Testament...

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    Bear/Shark Hybrid... RAWR...

    [IMG]

    BTW... some good info in this thread from SWS... I've been fascinated with sharks since a young age...

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