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Interesting read on Eagles drafting college graduates

Discussion in 'NFL Zone' started by Joe Realist, May 21, 2014.

  1. Joe Realist

    Joe Realist No Kool-Aid here!

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  2. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting. I've noticed from my own experience that people with degrees do better in any endeavor than people without. They tend to be not as lazy.
  3. basstapp

    basstapp Well-Known Member

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    I think that is a very general statement with no merit. Being in the marketing field I work with thousands of business owners and I couldn't guess who had a degree or not. The only time I know is if they have a plaque on the wall or if they are in a professional field like a doctor or lawyer.
    casmith07 likes this.
  4. burmafrd

    burmafrd Well-Known Member

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    Frankly I do not consider getting a degree really indicative of much of anything.
  5. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    Just sharing my observation. I think it's well documented as well. Really no argument.
  6. Yakuza Rich

    Yakuza Rich Well-Known Member

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    I have a college degree. But, I have become less and less impressed with college academics as time goes along. In the end, it doesn't mean that a person is smart or even that educated. So many colleges will give a person a degree if they are willing to pay the money to get it. I had quite a few friends that were not very bright and didn't work hard, but their parents had the money to pay for them to go to school for 6+ years and eventually got that diploma for them.

    I lived in Atlanta for 9 years where the city has the highest rate of college grads per capita. However, I've found much more intelligent and competent people in cities where the college grad rate was much lower. Part of that is there is a massive amount of colleges within a 3-hour radius of Atlanta. It doesn't mean that people are smart or educated, but there is better opportunity to find a college that will take you in.

    While I think it is an interesting concept, using the Patriots and Colts as a point is a bit faulty since they only had Tom Brady and Peyton Manning as their QB's. That makes everybody seem a bit brighter. Did the Colts' graduation rate fall off the earth in 2011 when Peyton got injured and they went 2-14?

    I think the bigger point here is Kelly taking the time to understand how his players learn and catering to what they feel works best.






    YR
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  7. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Staff Member

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    Agreed.

    Especially on the point about Kelly taking the time to understand how his players learn.
  8. DFWJC

    DFWJC Well-Known Member Zone Supporter

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    I was listening to a few people discuss this on the radio on the way to work today.
    Then I ended up looking it up.

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles...0001424052702304422704579572050338722302.html



    The evidence is pretty impressive. Kind of funny and sad for Jacksonville though--with them being the franchise with the least, while Seattle and Denver were two of the top 3 teams with the most graduates.

    It's not saying only take players with degrees, but it is saying the odds are greater that those players will get a second contract and, on average (key point), have better and longer NFL careers.

    My guess, and that's all it is, is that this would apply more to players a taken later in the drat than in round 1.

    Although I like the idea of generally (not always) getting players that actually attended class or are even team captains, I'd love for teams to follow this rule strictly, so more players like Emmitt Smith can fall to us :D
  9. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Staff Member

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    Agreed.

    I've found the same.

    Many (not all) college graduates believe that once they have the sheep-skin their days of learning are over with and that they've "made it".

    And in actuality all they've done is studied a bunch of stuff that isn't applicable in the real world and racked up a decent sized amount of debt.

    The colleges themselves have created this "mindset" and one understands why from a marketing point of view why they would do such a thing.

    In the "Contractor" thread, there is a lot of griping (and rightfully so) about the reality of working with contractors and part of the problem is that demand is outstripping the supply and there aren't enough of them. This creates a market where the contractor can get away with sloppy business habits because they know that there just isn't enough of them.

    Instead we spend a lot of money (as parents, guardians and the government) that we don't have to send kids to colleges getting degrees that aren't useful, and having student loans that they can't pay back.

    And at the same time there's a crying need for not just plumbers, electricians, HVAC specialists but for folks that can do factory work.
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  10. AbeBeta

    AbeBeta Well-Known Member

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    So you go to doctor who didn't complete med school?
  11. AbeBeta

    AbeBeta Well-Known Member

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    I'd disagree fully that there are degrees in areas that are not useful. The core competencies of any college degree, regardless of major, are important in most aspects of life. Competency in written and verbal expression, mathematics skills, critical thinking, and information literacy are central to any degree.

    There is a huge need for skilled trades people and factory workers - that has nothing to do with the value of a college education. If you are arguing that more people should simply go to trade school, I'd certainly agree - but again that doesn't mean a college degree is not valuable or of use in the real world.

    Also, I know 100s of college graduates -- I can't say that any have the attitude that "they've made it" and don't have any more learning to do.
  12. DFWJC

    DFWJC Well-Known Member Zone Supporter

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    I agree fully with this.
  13. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    This is one of the most ridiculous posts I've ever read. It takes a lot of hard work, dedication and sacrifice to earn a degree. College isn't all about learning to program, be an engineer, doctor, etc. College helps you develop general skills that don’t come from any one particular class. In school, you’ll write lots and lots of papers, and your writing skills will be honed along the way. Many programs feature a core curriculum of general classes that all students have to take—history, English, math, science—to help you gain a broad appreciation for the world at large, as well as develop a general familiarity with important concepts and principles outside of your field of study. This kind of instruction helps you become more well-rounded and versatile.

    Commitment is another great aspect of a college degree. You dedicate a lot of time to completing assignments, writing papers and studying for exams, and you learn priceless tactics like time management and how to focus on the task at hand.
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  14. Idgit

    Idgit Ice up, son. Ice up! Staff Member

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    It might also be that really talented players tend to enter the league early, and that the personality type that gets a degree after already being in the league is a personality type that's programmed for success, anyway.

    Or it might be that the extra time in college really is helpful in developing athletes into the types of players who can be successful in the pros. But it might be because of the extra football and not because of the extra education.

    Or it might be that guys who stick around longer when they might jump to the pros earlier do so because they tend to enjoy or be more committed to their college teams.

    Either way, the correlation is interesting on the surface. Its the kind of thing I'd want to unpack further, though, because I suspect there's a lot going on that contributes to the correlation.
  15. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Staff Member

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    Yeah, "useless" was too strong of a word. I should have used "not worth the investment". Here's just one article that highlights several degrees that won't get a person a lot of bang for their buck... http://www.salary.com/8-college-degrees-with-the-worst-return-on-investment/

    And I think kids are "strong-armed" into thinking that a college degree is an end-all OR more/better than learning a trade. The result is a lot of kids who spend an awful lot of money on college who probably would have been better off learning a trade, but we've instilled this the thought into their heads that a 4-year degree is the only way.

    I'll grant you that learning how to learn is an important take-a-way from college.
    jobberone likes this.
  16. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a degree?
  17. DFWJC

    DFWJC Well-Known Member Zone Supporter

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    I think that is the main focus of teams that lean towards drafting players with degrees.

    Plenty of exceptions both ways, but that is their line of thinking.
  18. Denim Chicken

    Denim Chicken Well-Known Member

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    I believe most entrepreneurs and business owners would disagree.
  19. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

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    I believe they wouldn't.
  20. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Staff Member

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    Me?

    Yes, an AAS in Petroleum Technology and a BA in Organizational Management.

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