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Our Sister Sarah Palin's Anti-elitist Charm

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by irvin88, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. irvin88

    irvin88 Active Member

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    OUR SISTER SARAH PALIN'S ANTI-ELITIST CHARM

    By RALPH PETERS
    September 20, 2008 --
    I KNOW Sarah Palin, and so does my wife.
    Neither of us ever actually met the governor of Alaska, but we grew up with her - in the small-town America despised by the leftwing elite.

    One gal-pal classmate of my wife's has even traveled from New York's Finger Lakes to Alaska to hunt moose with her husband. (Got one, too.) And no, Ms. Streisand, she isn't a redneck missing half her teeth - she's a lawyer.

    The sneering elites and their mediacrat fellow travelers just don't get it: How on earth could anyone vote for someone who didn't attend an Ivy League school? And having more than 1.7 children marks any woman as a rube. (If Palin had any taste, her teenage daughter would've had a quiet abortion in a discreet facility.)

    And what kind of retro-Barbie would stay happily married to her high-school sweetheart? Ugh. She even kills animals and eats them. (The meat and fish served in the upscale bistros patronized by Obama supporters appears by magic - it didn't really come from living things. . .)

    Palin has that hick accent, too. And that busy-mom beehive 'do. Double ugh! Bet she hasn't even read Ian McEwan's latest novel and can't explain Frank Gehry's vision for a new architecture. She and her blue-collar (triple ugh!) husband don't even own a McMansion, let alone an inherited family compound on the Cape.

    And she wants to be vice president?
    The opinion-maker elites see Sarah Palin clearly every time they look up from another sneering article in The New Yorker: She's a country-bumpkin chumpette from a hick state with low latte availability. She's not one of them and never will be. That's the real disqualifier in this race.

    Now let me tell you what those postmodern bigots with their multiple vacation homes and their disappointing trust-fund kids don't see:

    Sarah Palin's one of us. She actually represents the American people.
    When The New York Times, CNN, the NBC basket of basket cases and all the barking blog dogs insult Palin, they're insulting us. When they smear her, they're smearing every American who actually works for a living, who doesn't expect a handout, who doesn't have a full-time accountant to parse the family taxes, who believes in the Pledge of Allegiance and who thinks a church is more than just a tedious stop on daughter Emily's 100K wedding day.

    Go ahead, faux feminists and Hollywood deep thinkers: Snicker at Sarah America's degree from the University of Idaho, but remember that most Americans didn't attend Harvard or Princeton as a legacy after daddy donated enough to buy his kid's way in.

    Go ahead, campaign strategists: Mock Americans who go to church and actually pray. But you might want to run the Census numbers first.

    And go right ahead: Dismiss all of us who remember how, on the first day of deer season, our high school classrooms were half empty (not a problem at Andover or Exeter).

    That rube accent of Palin's? It's a howler. But she sounds a lot more like the rest of us than a Harvard man or a Smithie ever will.

    Why does Sarah Palin energize all of us who don't belong to the gilded leftwing circle? Because she's us. We sat beside her in class. We hung out after school (might've even shared a backseat combat zone on prom night). And now she lives next door, raising her kids.

    For the first time since Ronald Reagan, our last great president, we, the people, see a chance that one of us might have a voice in governing our country.

    Speaking of Reagan (Eureka College, Illinois), every chief executive we've had since the Gipper snapped his final salute as president has had the imprimatur of an Ivy League university.

    Now we have the Ivy League elite's "he's not only like us but he's a minority and we're so wonderful to support him" candidate, Sen. Barack Obama (Columbia and Harvard Law).

    Our country can't afford another one of these clowns. Harvard isn't the answer - Harvard's the problem.
    So here's the message Palin is sending on behalf of the rest of us (the down-market masses Dems love at election time and ignore once the voting's done): The rule of the snobs is over. It's time to give one of us a chance to lead.

    Sen. John McCain's one of us, too. He raised hell at Annapolis (quadruple ugh: military!), and he'll raise the right kind of hell in Washington.

    McCain's so dumb he really loves his country.
    Sarah Palin's dumb that way, too. How terribly unfashionable.
    Ralph Peters' latest book is "Looking for Trouble: Adventures in a Broken World."
  2. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    Great article... I especially like this line:


    I remember those days... Never missed an opening day since I started hunting in grade school.
  3. Danny White

    Danny White Winter is Coming

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    I remember that too.

    My family didn't hunt, and I was literally one of only about a half-dozen kids who would be in class on the opening day of hunting season. :(
  4. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    This is an effect I've never understood in politics. Why vote for someone just because they're like you? Similarity is not a qualification for political office. Now, I'm not saying that as anything against Palin's real qualifications and I know it's something that all candidates benefit from...I just think it's dumb.
  5. Danny White

    Danny White Winter is Coming

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    Maybe you think they relate to your situation... problems... issues.

    I dunno.

    I just vote for the person who's values and position on the issues most closely match mine.
  6. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    Its about a certain trust in a person when they share a lot of your views...

    Like for instance... I don't trust that Obama won't try to ban my guns that I use to hunt. I don't trust that he won't make my ammunition that I use to hunt so expensive, that I can't afford it. You know, like he tried to do in Illinois.

    I don't have to worry about that with McCain/Palin. They won't try to ban my guns.
  7. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    See, I don't think just because someone shares my values that they're necessarily ready to be an executive leader of the country. I mean, I wouldn't trust myself to do the job and I typically agree with myself on all my views lol. I just don't know that someone not going to an Ivy league school, like me, is reason to think that they could, say, balance the budget.
    I understand where you're coming from, I just look at it differently I guess.

    Also, would potential increases in ammo prices really be a deciding issue for you?
  8. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    That's exactly what it is, people think that a candidate can relate to them and therefor they will do whats best for them. But that's not how it works. It's like in 04 when Bush got the vote of people who would rather have a beer with Bush than Kerry. Whuppty-friggen do. Just because someone comes from a similar background or has similar hobbies, it doesn't mean that they're the best person to lead the country.

    The way you vote is the way people should vote, values and issues...not because neither of you went to Harvard.
  9. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    No... Thats just one of many issues.

    I was just giving an example why its nice to have someone who shares my values running for office.

    BUT... Banning guns? Yes, that would be a deciding issue for me. I could probably live with the 500% increase in ammo prices like Obama supported, but not a total ban on guns.
  10. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    Banning guns would be an issue for me too, and I've never even held one. I think that's a good example of how just because a candidate and I come from different worlds, we still share a common value. Palin's a hunter and I'm not, but we still share the value of protecting constitutional rights.
  11. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    Exactly...

    Thats really the only thing I get from sharing that specific value with her. A little trust on that one issue. Something I don't have with Obama.

    I already know that doesn't mean she would make a good president.
  12. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    I think that a lot of people don't understand that though and that's what annoys me during election season.
  13. WoodysGirl

    WoodysGirl Do it for the Vine! Staff Member

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    What is considered elitist?
  14. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    Obama:
    "And it's not surprising then that they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations."

    Obama:
    "The point I was making was not that my grandmother harbors any racial animosity. She doesn't. But she is a typical white person who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn't know there's a reaction that's been been bred into our experiences that don't go away and that sometimes come out in the wrong way and that's just the nature of race in our society."

    Thats what I consider elitist.
  15. WoodysGirl

    WoodysGirl Do it for the Vine! Staff Member

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    That doesn't really answer the question. That's just how you applied it.
  16. adamc91115

    adamc91115 New Member

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    I thought I answered it. In those examples, it feels like hes talking down to somebody... ME.

    And when he talks in general, I get the impression he feels that he is better than everyone else. Thats what I consider elitist.
  17. masomenos

    masomenos Less is more

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    I believe Websters defines elitist as "Whoever the current democratic candidate is".
  18. WoodysGirl

    WoodysGirl Do it for the Vine! Staff Member

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    I see. Those comments don't come across as elitist to me. I tend to think of elitism as a class issue as far as wealthy vs working class.

    I think his comments was too generic and uninformed and fed into stereotypes, but that didn't appear elitist to me.

    But thanks for responding.
  19. Danny White

    Danny White Winter is Coming

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    I'm sure you would do fine... probably much better than you think.
  20. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt °¤~Cold Eternal~¤° Staff Member

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    Some would rather vote for someone they could have a beer, BBQ with or go hunting with...instead of someone who is smart and confuses them with words.:laugh2:

    I even think some politicians dumb down their speaking at times because it makes them seem on the same level as voters.

    It always makes me laugh when people claim that it is the dems that are elitists when you have some of these republicans make much more money and much more certain of their stances.

    I mean...she does not blink and does not know what a VP does but she is darn certain she can do it.:laugh2:

    We got a presidential nominee wearing $500 italian loafers flying around in his wife's leer jet and she shows up to the RNC wearing a $300K worth of dress and jewelry yet Obama and Biden are the elitist.

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