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Reaction to Musharraf's resignation

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by BrAinPaiNt, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. BrAinPaiNt

    BrAinPaiNt Brotherhood of the Beard Staff Member

    60,031 Messages
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    Wakey Wakey, Eggs and Bakey

    Mon Aug 18, 5:05 AM ET

    ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf announced his resignation on Monday in the face of an impending impeachment motion by the ruling coalition government.
    Following are the views of analysts and officials.

    PAKISTAN INFORMATION MINISTER SHERRY REHMAN, TO SKY NEWS

    TELEVISION:

    "The pressure in Pakistan was mounting for him to step down as he was seen as standing in the way of any credible transition to democracy -- and today we saw him reading out his own epitaph on his misrule and lack of governance."

    "He tried to justify pretty much what he had done, but I think at the end of the day this was the only option, because the space for him to remain president had shrunk so much that it had become .. impossible to carry on."

    SAYEM ALI, ECONOMIST AT STANDARD CHARTERED BANK

    "This is a positive sign considering we were looking at a long drawn-out confrontation that will be avoided now.

    "It's a major victory for the new government but there is still a lot of uncertainty going forward. The main unifying force for the new coalition government was their mistrust of Musharraf, and it remains to be seen whether they can resolve the remaining issues.

    "First is the restoration of the deposed judges. They have set a three-day deadline for that. Next is the war of terror and both parties do not see eye to eye on the strategy for that going forward.

    "I expect markets to remain strong in the next two (to) three from the initial jubilation from Musharraf's resignation.

    ASAD IQBAL, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT ISMAIL IQBAL SECURITIES

    "It eliminates all the uncertainty in the market and I think the political uncertainty is coming to an end. The government will hopefully start concentrating on the economy. From an economic point of view, they have no excuses now and they have to perform.

    "As to whether it is good or bad for the country, that remains to be seen and we will tell two to three years from now."

    SANJAY MATHUR, ECONOMIST AT ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND

    "The broader issue right now is will it clear up the political situation? Will the coalition government work together? Will there be a power grab?

    "What I will like to see right now is the coalition government sticking together to address the economic problems -- rising inflation, widening trade gap et cetera."

    WAJID HASAN, PAKISTAN'S HIGH COMMISSIONER (AMBASSADOR) TO

    LONDON, TO SKY NEWS TELEVISION

    "He damaged Pakistan a lot. He claimed that he put Pakistan back on the map of the world -- (but) the fact is that Pakistan, during his time, came to be known as an epicenter of international terrorism."

    "The general perception was that he was part of the problem, not the solver of the problem."
  2. burmafrd

    burmafrd Well-Known Member

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    I think overall he did more good then bad. The real problem is that the Pakistani Intelligence service is riddled with Taliban and fundamentalists. He never had really enough support to clean it out. I doubt the new government will do any better.

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