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Saddam's Terror Links

Discussion in 'Political Zone' started by zrinkill, Mar 24, 2008.

  1. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    March 24, 2008


    Five years on, few Iraq myths are as persistent as the notion that the Bush Administration invented a connection between Saddam Hussein and al Qaeda. Yet a new Pentagon report suggests that Iraq's links to world-wide terror networks, including al Qaeda, were far more extensive than previously understood.

    Naturally, it's getting little or no attention. Press accounts have been misleading or outright distortions, while the Bush Administration seems indifferent. Even John McCain has let the study's revelations float by. But that doesn't make the facts any less notable or true.

    The redacted version of "Saddam and Terrorism" is the most definitive public assessment to date from the Harmony program, the trove of "exploitable" documents, audio and video records, and computer files captured in Iraq. On the basis of about 600,000 items, the report lays out Saddam's willingness to use terrorism against American and other international targets, as well as his larger state sponsorship of terror, which included harboring, training and equipping jihadis throughout the Middle East.


    "The rise of Islamic fundamentalism in the region gave Saddam the opportunity to make terrorism, one of the few tools remaining in Saddam's 'coercion' toolbox, not only cost effective but a formal instrument of state power," the authors conclude. Throughout the 1990s, the Iraqi Intelligence Service (IIS) cooperated with Hamas; the Palestine Liberation Front, which maintained a Baghdad office; Force 17, Yasser Arafat's private army; and others. The IIS gave commando training for members of Egyptian Islamic Jihad, the organization that assassinated Anwar Sadat and whose "emir" was Ayman al-Zawahiri, who became Osama bin Laden's second-in-command when the group merged with al Qaeda in 1998.
    At the very least the report should dispel the notion that outwardly "secular" Saddam would never consort with religious types like al Qaeda.



    A pan-Arab nationalist, Saddam viewed radical Islamists as potential allies, and they likewise. According to a 1993 memo, Saddam decided to "form a group to start hunting Americans present on Arab soil; especially Somalia," where al Qaeda was then working with warlords against U.S. humanitarian forces. Saddam also trained Sudanese fighters in Iraq.


    The Pentagon report cites this as "a tactical example" of their cooperation. When Saddam "was ordering action in Somalia aimed at the American presence, Osama bin Laden was doing the same thing." Saddam took an interest in "far-flung terrorist groups . . . to locate any organization whose services he might use in the future." The Harmony documents "reveal that the regime was willing to co-opt or support organizations it knew to be part of al Qaeda -- as long as that organization's near-term goals supported Saddam's long-term version."


    For 20 years, such "support" included using Fedayeen Saddam training camps to school terrorists, especially Palestinians but also non-Iraqis "directly associated" with al Qaeda, continuing up to the fall of Baghdad. Saddam also provided financial support and weapons, amounting to "a state-directed program of significant scale." In July 2001, the regime began patronizing a terror cartel in Bahrain calling itself the Army of Muhammad, which, according to an Iraqi memo, "is under the wings of bin Laden."


    It's true that the Pentagon report found no "smoking gun," i.e., a direct connection on a joint Iraq-al Qaeda operation. Supposedly this vindicates the view that Iraq's liberation was launched on false premises. But the Administration was always cautious, with Colin Powell alleging merely a "sinister nexus" in his 2003 U.N. speech. If anything, sinister is an understatement. The main Iraq intelligence failure was over WMD, but the report indicates that the CIA also underestimated Saddam's ties to global terror cartels.


    The Administration has always maintained that Iraq is just one front in the war on terror; and the report offers "evidence of logistical preparation for terrorist operations in other nations, including those in the West." In 2002, an IIS memo explained to Saddam that Iraqi embassies were stockpiling weapons, while many of the terrorists trained in Fedayeen camps were dispatched to London with counterfeit documents, where they circulated throughout Europe.


    Around the same time, the IIS began to manufacture better improvised explosive devices "designed to be used in civilian areas," and the regime bureaucratized suicide operations, with local Baath Party leaders competing to provide recruits for Saddam as part of a "Martyrdom Project."


    All of these are inconvenient facts for those who want to assert that somehow Saddam could have been easily contained and presented no threat to the U.S. The Harmony files buttress the case that the decision to oust Saddam was the right one -- which makes it all the more puzzling that the Bush Administration is mum. It isn't the first time the White House has ceded the Iraq debate to its opponents.




    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120631495290958169.html?mod=opinion_main_review_and_outlooks



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  2. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Chilling Confirmation

    Yes, Saddam Hussein was an Islamofascist threat.

    By Deroy Murdock

    As Operation Iraqi Freedom is now five years old, a new study confirms that ousting Saddam Hussein was justified and vital to U.S. national security. Though war critics hate to admit it, the Baathist dictator was up to his mustache in aid for Islamofascist terrorism.

    As a report from the Institute for Defense Analyses explains, “captured Iraqi documents uncovered strong evidence that links the regime of Saddam Hussein to regional and global terrorism.” IDA’s review of some 600,000 documents discovered in Iraq since Coalition forces liberated Baghdad indicates that “from 1991through 2003, the Saddam regime regarded inspiring, sponsoring, directing, and executing acts of terrorism as an element of state power.”

    IDA presents chilling details:

    [IMG] A May 1999 memorandum to Fedayeen Saddam leader Uday Hussein — the despot’s elder son — outlined a bombing and assassination campaign called BLESSED JULY. Among “50 Fedayeen martyrs,” selected from an elite terrorist-training camp, “The top ten will work in the European field — London.” The memo continues: “After passing the final test the Fedayeen will be sent as undercover passengers, each one according to his work site.”

    [IMG] A July 2002 weapons inventory of 12 Iraqi embassies, written just eight months before the American-led invasion of Iraq, found them far better armed than diplomatic security requires: “Vienna — Explosive charges, rifles with silencers, hand grenades, and Kalashnikov rifles. Pakistan — Explosive materials of TNT. . . . Thailand — Plastic explosive charges and booby-trapped suitcases. . . . Turkey — Missile launcher, missile, and pistols with silencers.” This document adds: “Between the year 2000 and 2002 . . . explosive materials were transported to the embassies outside Iraq for special work, upon the approval of the Director of the Iraqi Intelligence Service [IIS].”

    [IMG] Building car bombs became a bureaucratized task, as a summarized September 4, 1999, document illustrates.

    “An approval memorandum from IIS Directorate 4 to Section 27 to load a vehicle with 50 to 75 kilograms [110 to 165 pounds] of explosive material and provide to the At Ta’mim Intelligence Branch [M52] for a ‘special duty.’” Further, an “Inspection Certificate Form” should verify the car bomb’s compliance with chemical, electrical, and mechanical standards. It also recommends using a Duracell battery given “the importance of the duty.”

    [IMG] A September 2001 Iraqi military-intelligence letter says “the Division Commands should launch a campaign among their members, supporters, and backers of the Party encouraging them to volunteer in suicide operations, and have them write volunteer statements, preferably in their blood.” It lists 43 such “suicide volunteers.”

    [IMG] The Fedayeen Saddam forwarded Uday Hussein a letter from Nazah, a widow requesting assistance with her husband’s pension. She recalls that “he carried out a suicide mission on 19 July 2000, and exploded himself at the [apparently Kurdistani] Ibn Sina Hotel during the presence of US and UK citizens. . . . ” She also mentions that he “Detonated a car [bomb] during the convoy of [former French first lady] Danielle Mitterrand in Halsabajah City, which killed forty enemies.”

    A March 18, 1993 IIS memo to Saddam Hussein reads, “We list herein the organizations that our agency cooperates with. . . . ” Among nine terrorist groups, it cites Egyptian Islamic Jihad (“It carried out numerous successful operations, including the assassination of Sadat”), Abu Nidal’s Fatah — which killed at least 407 innocents, including 10 Americans — (“We have been in contact with the organization since 1973 and have provided financial and logistical support, such as vehicles” ), and the Palestine Liberation Front, whose terrorists murdered wheelchair-bound American retiree Leon Klinghoffer aboard the hijacked Achille Lauro ocean liner in October 1985. “Currently has an office in Baghdad,” the memo states. “They were assigned and carried out commando operations for us against American interests in the [1991] war.”

    A July 28, 1998 letter specified three such missions:
    -“Burning the American Airlines office in the Philippines.”
    -“Placing an explosive device near an American base in Izmir [Turkey].”
    -“Placing an explosive device on the pipe lines that carry oil to an American base in southern Spain.”


    http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=MjYyMTFkMjA2M2M4ZDUwNDM1MTYxMTlhN2EyOWFhNGU=&w=MA==

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  3. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Every country in the middle east knows someone who knows someone who blows people up. That doesnt mean we invade their country. We'd have to invade every country on earth. John Walker Lindh was a Taliban from California,so should we invade wine country because of their terrorist links?

    If any of these things were real reasons to sacrifice our soldiers lives , why did Bush/Cheney rely on fake stories (Mohammed Atta meeting in Czechoslovikia with Iraqi agents, Iraq trying to buy uranuim from Niger, etc) to lead us into war?
  4. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    So basically all you got is ..... nuu uhhhh.
  5. Cajuncowboy

    Cajuncowboy Preacher From The Black Lagoon

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    You've got to be kidding me, right????
  6. Bizwah

    Bizwah Well-Known Member

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    I think invading Iraq was the right choice.

    We had been attacked....and we warned other countries that we would defend ourselves. Now, right or wrong, we were ready to fight.

    Anyway, you have a crazy dictator that had shown the willingness to start a war...to kill his own people...to use chemical weapons.

    Now intelligence was faulty, about massive stockpiles of said weapons but Sadaam simply could've avoided the invasion if he would've complied with weapons inspectors. But he kept refusing....

    We erred on the side of caution.....I'd do it every single time. Especially after 9/11 when our country came under attack. We were on the alert.

    Our mistake was underestimating the numbers we would need....and not having a clear exit strategy.....But invading? Right choice, IMO.
  7. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Intelligence was not faulty, thats the key. There was no support for the war without the deliberately misleading info about wmd's, Atta in the Czech Republic, the phony Niger uranuim scam, and Colin Powells lies before the UN, etc. Things like a being crazy dictator , invading Kuwait, gassing his own people only caused people to support sanctions not invasion.And according to Hans Blix, Saddam WAS cooperating with inspectors before we invaded.
  8. Bizwah

    Bizwah Well-Known Member

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    He was?

    Nope....

    We gave him several chances....drop dead dates. Each time he would flaunt them, then when it began to look ugly he would "comply"....for a time.....

    Then it would start over again.....

    We tired of the game....especially after 9/11.
  9. Cajuncowboy

    Cajuncowboy Preacher From The Black Lagoon

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    No, according to Hans Blix he was NOT cooperating. Blix said because of that he could not verify that Saddam was disarming.

    Get your facts straight.
  10. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Which Iraq had nothing to do with.

    But we knew that. And went to war anyway. 4000 dead, 20000 maimed, countless families ruined, a quarter trillion dollars down the drain (and counting), and still nothing to show for it.

    Yeah ,Id do it again too.
  11. Cajuncowboy

    Cajuncowboy Preacher From The Black Lagoon

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    Sure we do. We haven't been attacked since then.
  12. Bizwah

    Bizwah Well-Known Member

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    You fail to see the point.

    This is what Democrats continue to spew. "Iraq had nothing to do with 9/11!"

    Duh!

    The point is this. We were attacked. We told the world that we would defend ourselves. We told them that all terrorists....those linked with Al-Queada (oh, however it's spelled now)...and those that weren't (North Korea, Sadaam) that we would be prepared to fight back.

    Most of us thought that Sadaam would harbor those terrorists....or at the very least provide them with weapons....chemical or conventional...if given the opportunity.

    Sadaam was a threat....he wanted us to think he was a bigger threat than he was...that was why he continued to play games with the inspectors.

    We weren't going to take chances. Right choice...IMO.

    How many of us, if we feel our home/family were threatened, wouldn't act?
  13. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    Right off wikipedia on the Iraq war :" In March 2003 ,Hans Blix reported that "No evidence of proscribed activities have so far been found in Iraq, saying that progress had been made in inspections which would continue. " But the US declared that "diplomacy had failed and would continue with the coalition...blah , blah, blah, bs, bs, bs."

    Get YOUR facts straight!
  14. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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    We did act. We invaded Afghanistan , the guys who were harboring Bin Laden. Remember Afghanistan? Where the Taliban is getting stronger again because our military is so involved in playing referee (sorry spreading democracy) in Iraq.The reason everyone thought Saddam would harbor/help Al qaeda(?) is cause our government was telling us this when they knew there wasnt good evidence to support it.
  15. burmafrd

    burmafrd Well-Known Member

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    Hank, you are very new here and you must realize that Wikipedia is NEVER used since it is not respected by most researchers. Mainly because ANYONE can get inthere and enter whatever they want and it is NOT CHECKED by anyone.
    You also might want to do some more research yourself before you FURTHER embarrass yourself.
    Russia
    Israel
    France
    England
    ALL those countries thought that Iraq had lots of WMD.
    So did Germany, who originally sold Saddam most of the technical material needed to make them.
    Saddam used Chemical agents against his own people and Iran.
    We found lots after Desert Storm.
    Over 500 artillery rds loaded with mustard have been found in Iraq since we went in (enough to kill approx 50,000 people).
    Yes Saddam did have WMD. And more to the point, as it has come out since we got him, is that he was going to play a waiting game untill the UN sanctions were gone and he could rebuild. He still had his oil money and lots of scientists and technical specialists.
    The Hijacker of the Achille Lauro was allowed by Saddam to retire and live in Iraq with security provided by Iraq. A facility was found that was used to train Aircraft hijackers near Baghdad.
    I could go on but what is the point. You sound like someone that will ignore facts if they do not agree with what you want to believe.
  16. SuspectCorner

    SuspectCorner Bromo

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    Five years later - and STILL frantically searching for that purported "smoking gun".

    The "redacted" SADDAM AND TERRORISM report... :rolleyes:

    And the link between Saddam and Al-Quaeda lays exactly where in this "exhaustive review"?

    All it does is further reinforce (barely) what was already known - Saddam Hussein was a very bad man. It utterly FAILS at uncovering any link between Saddam and the operations of al-Quaeda and bin Laden... which was the reason behind the study in the first place (redacted or otherwise). Which might explain why the Pentagon and the current administration belayed their initial plans to ballyhoo and widely release it.

    Intead it appears in op-ed pieces (though more frequently thru obscure right-wing blogs) like the one you used to initiate this thread... another smoking popgun.

    http://moderate.wordpress.com/2008/03/10/exhaustive-study-no-saddam-al-qaida-link/
  17. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    The Wall Street Journal is an obscure right wing blog?

    :lmao2:
  18. hank2k

    hank2k Member

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  19. zrinkill

    zrinkill Diamond surrounded by trash

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    Link?
  20. Cajuncowboy

    Cajuncowboy Preacher From The Black Lagoon

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    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/middle_east/jan-june03/blix_2-13.html

    SPENCER MICHELS: Hans Blix is said to have taken the weapons inspector's job reluctantly three years ago. In fact, the man who's now 74 had already begun his retirement when the U.N. asked him to head its Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission, or UNMOVIC.

    Blix was a compromise candidate before the U.N. Security Council. The U.S. and Britain had pushed for Rolf Ekeus, who was considered tougher, but France, Russia and China opposed him.

    RICHARD HOLBROOKE: We have further discussed a number of other candidates and found consensus on only one: Hans Blix of Sweden, another very distinguished international civil servant, whose career most notably included leadership of the IAEA in Vienna.

    SPENCER MICHELS: Blix began his career as a lawyer, and served in Sweden's foreign service for two decades, including the post of foreign minister in 1978.

    Hans BlixFrom 1981 to 1997, Blix headed the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency. The IAEA monitors compliance with the nuclear non- proliferation treaty. Blix took the job at UNMOVIC, created specifically to disarm Iraq's chemical and biological weapons, in January 2000.

    While at the IAEA, Blix oversaw inspections of nuclear power plants in North Korea and South Africa, as well as Iraq. But during his watch in the 80s, the agency did not detect Baghdad's nuclear weapons program until the Gulf War ended in 1991.

    Mohamed ElBaradei succeeded Blix as IAEA director general. The new round of Iraqi inspections began in November. A month later, Blix resisted U.S. requests that he move aggressively to take Iraqi scientists out of the country for interviews.

    HANS BLIX: And I have said that we are not going to abduct anybody, and we are not serving as a defection agency.

    SPENCER MICHELS: Blix has also distanced himself from American rhetoric against Iraq.

    REPORTER: Pres. Bush continuously accuses Baghdad of playing hide and seek. Does UNMOVIC share the same sentiments?

    HANS BLIX: Well, I don't want to express myself in those words. But, as you realize, there are things that have gone well, like the access, prompt access, like setting up of the infrastructure, where the Iraqis have been helpful. But there are other areas where we are not satisfied.

    SPENCER MICHELS: In the days before his January report to the U.N., Blix denied that his inspections would end any time soon.

    HANS BLIX: Well, we are not the ones who have established the 27th of January as the end of history. We were asked in that resolution to update the Council.

    Hans BlixUpdate is not a final report, it's an updating about what has happened and what have you learned in these two months, and that's what we're going to do. And we can see a lot of work ahead of us, beyond that date, if we are allowed to do so.

    SPENCER MICHELS: A few days later, at the Security Council, Blix noted several problems with Baghdad's compliance.

    HANS BLIX: Iraq appears not to have come to a genuine acceptance, not even today, of the disarmament which was demanded of it and which it needs to carry out to win the confidence of the world and to live in peace.

    SPENCER MICHELS: Last weekend, when he returned to Baghdad, Blix said Iraq was starting to heed the mounting international criticism.

    HANS BLIX: They gave us some papers which analyzed and gave some further information and we had some discussions with the scientists and that's why when I talk about a beginning I have not seen this before and I think that was hopeful. We are not at all at the end of the road.

    SPENCER MICHELS: This week a reporter asked Blix whether his report tomorrow represents D-day for his mission. Blix said, "No, there are many days. Friday is an important day."

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