1. Welcome to CowboysZone!  Join us!  Come on!  You know you want to!

Spurs ownership gives middle finger to Raiders

Discussion in 'Sports Zone' started by AmberBeer, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

    3,006 Messages
    1,052 Likes Received
  2. EST_1986

    EST_1986 Well-Known Member

    1,107 Messages
    767 Likes Received
    eh not really a middle finger just a jealous rage.
  3. WPBCowboysFan

    WPBCowboysFan Well-Known Member

    5,578 Messages
    1,844 Likes Received
    What does the article say? Any of you digital subscribers out there?
  4. CowboyFan74

    CowboyFan74 Cowboys Analyst

    12,595 Messages
    532 Likes Received
  5. bounce

    bounce Active Member

    692 Messages
    206 Likes Received
  6. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

    3,006 Messages
    1,052 Likes Received
    Jealousy of what? I'm curious.
  7. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

    3,006 Messages
    1,052 Likes Received
    In the wake of Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis' whirlwind tour of San Antonio, sources with knowledge of the visit said Spurs Sports & Entertainment would be against the Raiders, as they are currently structured, relocating to South Texas.
    SS&E is the holding company headed by Peter Holt that owns the Spurs, the WNBA's Stars and the minor league hockey Rampage team. According to sources, it continues to studiously eye a venture into professional soccer.

    Davis' San Antonio stops included one to Holt's home, said former Mayor Henry Cisneros, part of a who's-who collection of local civic and business titans that reignited talk of whether San Antonio is a viable NFL market. Although Cisneros described Davis as a “big fan of the Spurs” who wanted to meet Holt to find out “how a winning franchise does it,” sources said business was also discussed.

    Holt did not return phone messages requesting an interview, but Spurs shareholder Charlie Amato indicated that SS&E harbors concerns about its long-term financial health should it be forced to compete with another major league franchise for sponsorships, suite sales and ticket sales.

    The solution, Amato said, would be for SS&E to have controlling interest in the Raiders or perhaps any other major league franchise that wanted to move to San Antonio.

    “I would be more excited about the Oakland Raiders moving to San Antonio if the Spurs ownership group had the possibility of purchasing the team,” said Amato, chairman and co-founder of Southwest Business Corp.

    Amato said that if SS&E controlled the Raiders, it would ensure that the football club would be well run by a management team that has proven marketing success in a challenging environment. A template would be available in the form of Tom Benson's ownership in New Orleans of the NFL's Saints and the NBA's Pelicans.

    “We have developed a successful culture under the leadership of Peter Holt and have 20- to 25-year employees who have the ability to manage both franchises and help lower the overall cost of running an NFL team,” Amato said.

    “(The Spurs' control) would make it more affordable and more appealing to the San Antonio market. ... We are blessed with a great ownership group in which we park our egos at the door when we have our meetings, and Peter never abuses (us) by shoving things down our throats. I have been in other minority situations with other groups where it was a nightmare.”

    A Spurs-controlled NFL team would also ensure that the football club would be culturally compatible with the NBA power, Amato said.

    Indeed, it's hard to imagine two more different franchises than the Spurs and Raiders. With the exception of their silver and black colors, the clubs have little in common.

    The Spurs are the defending NBA champions, having destroyed the Miami Heat two months ago for their fifth league title in 16 years. The Raiders won three Super Bowls between the 1976 and 1983 seasons, but they haven't been to the playoffs since 2002.

    By any measure, the Spurs are one of the best-run franchises in all of sports, while the Raiders are considered one of the worst run in the NFL.

    For years, the Spurs have filled their roster with good citizens. The Raiders, with their menacing “Black Hole” fans and the “Just win, baby” legacy of their late owner Al Davis, embrace their renegade image.

    “It's very important that another sports franchise that comes into San Antonio has the same high-quality culture that exists with the Spurs,” Amato said.

    Billionaire B.J. “Red” McCombs also met with Mark Davis. Although a source said Davis appeared to be open to adding an equity partner, McCombs said it was uncertain whether the Raiders owner would want local ownership, should he decide to relocate to San Antonio.

    The concerns of Amato notwithstanding, one industry expert believes that an NFL team could succeed in San Antonio independent of the Spurs' control.

    Bernie Mullin, chairman and CEO of The Aspire Group, an Atlanta-based global sports and entertainment firm with ties to the University of Texas, believes that NFL teams seeking to relocate should seriously consider moving to South or Central Texas.

    “San Antonio is a very attractive market for the right sport — and football is one of those right sports,” said Mullin, a former NBA executive. “The San Antonio market and certainly the South-Central Texas market of San Antonio and Austin combined are ones that definitely warrant in-depth consideration for any major league team (other than the NBA) that's looking to move to another market.”

    The Aspire Group, which does ticket marketing, sales and service support for UT, recently concluded what Mullin termed a “very comprehensive study” for a major league franchise seeking to relocate that is not a member of the NFL. Among the global markets targeted were San Antonio, Austin and a combination of the two cities, Mullin said.

    “The work we did indicated San Antonio and certainly somewhere between the San Antonio and Austin markets would appear to be extremely viable for the NFL,” he said.

    While he acknowledged that San Antonio lacks a robust corporate base for pro sports sponsorships, Mullin believes that an NFL team with only roughly 10 home games per season in such a tourism hotbed as San Antonio would draw fans and sponsors from an “extremely large radius.” He also stressed that the NFL's lucrative television contracts would help offset the city's meager corporate base.

    “The centralized revenue streams, especially from those contracts, are so large, so substantial, they make the (paltry) sponsorship revenue in a small corporate market less impactful,” Mullin said.

    The Aspire Group's study also pointed out that although NFL owners seek markets with average annual income much higher than San Antonio's, that concern could be offset by marketing Austin.

    “The average disposable income in the (San Antonio) market is a concern, but it's higher in Austin,” Mullin said.

    Still, it would appear unlikely that the Raiders would leave a top-five media market for one ranked in the 30s. The Raiders' stadium lease with Oakland and Alameda County expires after this season. Davis has said repeatedly that he wants to keep the team in Oakland but does not want to sign another short-term lease without an agreement in place for a new stadium.

    Larry Reid, Oakland vice mayor and councilman, said he believes that a new stadium for the Raiders would cost more than $1 billion, with funding of about $200 million coming from the NFL's stadium loan program. The rest would come from the Raiders and private developers.

    “Talks are still alive and there is definitely reason for hope, but the window of opportunity is somewhat closing fairly quickly on us,” Reid said. “We will continue to have discussions with the Raiders and, hopefully, they will continue to be committed to staying here in the city of Oakland, as they have indicated.”

    But even if the Raiders stay put, it's reasonable to believe that NFL teams with stadium issues will come calling. San Antonio City Council member Joe Krier, for one, believes that San Antonio should be prepared to rebuff those flirtations should the Spurs be threatened.

    “(Former U.S. Sen.) Phil Gramm used to say, 'It never hurts to tell your sweetheart you love her,'” Krier said. “The Spurs have been our sweetheart for 30 years. They have put this community on the map. This community has given them its love and affection. I wouldn't want to do something that says, 'You're my old girlfriend, but the Oakland Raiders called, and y'all kind of need to take one step back so we can start dancing with our new girlfriend.'

    “I'm not inclined to do that. There'd have to be some awfully good reasons that make an awful lot of sense for us to do that.”

    “I wouldn't want to march down this road of offering concessions and facilities and all the things you usually do to get a team without making sure that our existing sweetheart, the San Antonio Spurs, is comfortable at least with where we're going. I'd want to have some conversations,” Krier said. “Whether that means that Peter Holt is an investor, or the Spurs are an investor ... that would be decided above my pay grade.

    “But I would sure want to know what the Spurs organization thinks about us marching into a new pro team, and particularly marching into a new pro team with a whole bunch of incentives and financial support.”

    torsborn@express-news.net

    jbaugh@express-news.net

  8. WPBCowboysFan

    WPBCowboysFan Well-Known Member

    5,578 Messages
    1,844 Likes Received
    Why would any owner of an NFL team agree to move his team to another city if he had to give up his control of the team?

    Sounds like the Spurs dont want anybody coming in their territory as they are really afraid of losing top dog status in their city. They know basketball will always be trumped by football. Thats the issue - not "how the teams are structured." Playing 2nd fiddle and having somebody else getting some slices of the pie are the real issues.
    PA Cowboy Fan likes this.
  9. Manwiththeplan

    Manwiththeplan Well-Known Member

    5,073 Messages
    295 Likes Received
    The Spurs don't play second fiddle anyone. The could move to LA, and immediately be more popular than the Lakers. The could move to NY and unseat the Yankees as the most popular team. And we have already seen who is more popular on a Cowboys message board.....
    RonSpringsdaman20 and AmberBeer like this.
  10. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

    3,006 Messages
    1,052 Likes Received
    There's an article in today's SA Express News with a "unnamed Spurs source" refuting the fact that the Spurs are against the Raiders moving to SA. So I don't know what to believe.
  11. WPBCowboysFan

    WPBCowboysFan Well-Known Member

    5,578 Messages
    1,844 Likes Received
    Well, how could the Spurs be against it if its on their terms and they get control? The real question is would they be against it under NORMAL circumstances?
  12. WPBCowboysFan

    WPBCowboysFan Well-Known Member

    5,578 Messages
    1,844 Likes Received
    [IMG]
  13. AmberBeer

    AmberBeer Well-Known Member

    3,006 Messages
    1,052 Likes Received
    Here's the article from today:

    SAN ANTONIO — Leading up to Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis' visit here last month, city officials quietly and feverishly prepared for his arrival, updated an NFL relocation study and war-gamed a potential move by the NFL team to San Antonio.

    Documents obtained Tuesday by the San Antonio Express-News show a much more concerted effort to attract the Raiders than previously has been disclosed.

    A Raiders move to San Antonio still is considered a long shot by those with knowledge of the matter, but the city appears to have presented itself as a superior landing spot should the Bay Area franchise decide to relocate, and strong relationships between Davis and local leaders could help spur the deal.

    In the several weeks preceding the July 18 weekend — when Davis, Raiders Chief Operating Officer Marc Badain and Larry Delsen, a business manager and CPA, visited with the city's highest-ranking officials and business leaders — city staff conducted significant analysis of a potential deal and others worked to ensure that the weekend would be a “once in a lifetime” tour.

    The documents obtained by the newspaper under the state's open-records law reveal just how much detail went into preparing for Davis' visit.

    The city has asked the Texas attorney general whether San Antonio may withhold several pages of documents because releasing them now “could have a negative competitive impact on the city,” according to Di Galvan, the city's communications director.

    Meanwhile, a source with knowledge of Davis' meetings in San Antonio discounted comments made by Spurs shareholder Charlie Amato, who said the five-time NBA champion team harbored concerns about a Raiders relocation and suggested that the Spurs purchase the Raiders. The source was not authorized to speak about the matter and asked to remain unnamed.

    The Express-News previously has reported that Spurs owner Peter Holt had positive and fruitful conversations with Davis when he was here. The two met at Holt's Terrell Hills home July 19.

    “Peter assured Mark that (the Spurs) would not be a roadblock to the Raiders relocating to San Antonio and would find ways to work with them,” the source said.

    On Tuesday in Oxnard, California, where the Raiders held a joint practice with the Dallas Cowboys, Davis was asked to characterize the nature of his meeting with San Antonio officials.

    “It was a serious conversation,” Davis told the San Francisco Chronicle. “I don't waste my time just having meetings. But we continue to try to get something done in Oakland.”

    Documents provided by the city also show Davis and his executives met that night for dinner with former Mayor Henry Cisneros, and B.J. “Red” McCombs at his Olmos Park mansion.

    The documents show the city spent $15,000 to re-engage with Premier Partnerships, a California-based sports-sales and advisory firm, which in 2011 studied the feasibility of pro sports in San Antonio.

    The 2011 report said San Antonio wasn't ready for the NFL or Major League Baseball, in part because of the lack of Fortune 500 companies in town. But the updated analysis paints a different picture.

    The consultant recommends “formalizing discussions with the ownership group of the Oakland Raiders,” and offers a series of recommended next steps, including:

    Continuing to explore financial structures with ownership.

    Meeting with NFL executives.

    Finalizing renovation expenses for the Alamodome.

    Included in a chain of emails between Mike Sawaya, the city's director of Convention, Sports and Entertainment Facilities, and Premier Partnerships consultants, is a spreadsheet that has identified $27.4 million in necessary upgrades to the Alamodome in order for the facility to meet NFL standards.

    The document estimates the “build out” of 14 suites to be $1.8 million, the construction of an additional 44 suites to be $6 million, and the addition of a new sound system to be $3.5 million.

    Such upgrades would come on top of $43 million in potential improvements the city would likely do if it wins another NCAA Final Four bid.

    The study also details potential funding sources in the event the city entered into an agreement with the Raiders to build a new stadium.

    The city has provided a substantial amount of documents to the Raiders since Davis' July visit.

    Cisneros was the architect of the plan to show Davis what San Antonio has to offer. Cisneros' son-in-law played for the Raiders and now works in the team's front office.

    But the ties between San Antonio and Oakland run even deeper.

    Robert Marbut Jr., who worked as Cisneros' chief of staff, has been working on details of the deal. When Davis' late father, Al Davis, moved the Raiders from Los Angeles back to Oakland in the 1980s, Marbut helped facilitate the move.

    Reached by phone Tuesday, Marbut, whose name appears in the documents obtained by the newspaper, declined to comment.

    Those documents show city officials went to great lengths to ensure San Antonio had a positive impact on Davis. When he and his representatives checked in at the Grand Hyatt, they were treated to top-notch VIP service — including a corner suite for the Raiders owner and personalized notes from hotel management. It is unclear who paid for the hotel rooms and suite, but it was not the city, Galvan said.

    They were wined and dined in a private room (with a private “dining captain”) at Ruth's Chris Steak House on their first night in town. Records show dinner, not including alcohol, topped $2,000 for 17 guests. The party was served New York strip, rib-eye streak, Ahi tuna stacks and barbecued shrimp. The $765 bar tab, which was paid for by the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, included four bottles of Magnificat wine, three bottles from the Jordan Vineyard & Winery and one Miller Lite.

    Their weekend was packed. It included breakfast on a River Walk barge and a Sunday helicopter tour of potential stadium sites before Davis and his associates departed from McCombs' private hangar at International Airport.

    Later, Sawaya followed up in an email to Badain.

    “Marc — It was a real pleasure meeting you this weekend. I sincerely hope you had a positive impression of the prospects presented in San Antonio,” Sawaya wrote. “I did speak to City Manager, Sheryl Sculley, after your send-off meeting yesterday. We are meeting today to determine next steps, and will provide you with whatever follow-up documentation that is necessary to keep our dialogue moving. I am making plans to attend your training camp next week in Napa, and will be in touch very soon.”

    A few days later, Sawaya rented a car at San Francisco International Airport and drove to Oakland.

    On Tuesday, he downplayed his visit, saying he was headed to a convention in Portland, Ore., and had a lengthy layover in the Bay Area.

    “I had this trip planned,” Sawaya said. “This was just a courtesy call to kind of keep the dialogue going, more than anything.”


    jbaugh@express-news.net


    torsborn@express-news.net
  14. EST_1986

    EST_1986 Well-Known Member

    1,107 Messages
    767 Likes Received
    This has to be a sarcastic post right?
  15. WPBCowboysFan

    WPBCowboysFan Well-Known Member

    5,578 Messages
    1,844 Likes Received
    I guess the first thing that would have to be dealt with by the league is what Jerry thinks. I assume it would at least be taken into consideration.
    khiladi likes this.
  16. Manwiththeplan

    Manwiththeplan Well-Known Member

    5,073 Messages
    295 Likes Received
    yes :)
    RonSpringsdaman20 likes this.
  17. MC KAos

    MC KAos Well-Known Member

    7,496 Messages
    39 Likes Received
    I think it would affect the spurs, luckily it would only be from November to January if they were to make the playoffs. I hope they move but to a stadium in northern San Antonio so it can be marketed to Austin as well. In fact, it would be cool to have a "complex" if you will, with an MLS team, an nfl team like the raiders and the spurs somewhere along I 35 in between Austin and San Antonio, maybe new braunfels or San Marcos
  18. bounce

    bounce Active Member

    692 Messages
    206 Likes Received
    If they did build, I wouldn't be surprised to see it landing in the 35/Thousand Oaks area off Wurzbach Pkway. That's where they had as a possible spot for ATT before they decided to "revitalize" the area it's in now - and we all see how that worked out. That area already has Toyota Stadium for soccer, Heroes Stadium for HS football and Morgan's Wonderland. It could blow up that area really well - and it's right on 35 which would draw the Austin traffic.
  19. khiladi

    khiladi Well-Known Member

    11,876 Messages
    1,939 Likes Received
    No disrespect to the Spurs and their greatness, but you do realize that basketball ratings for the NBA finals was even lower this year than last year, per game watched? And ratings of NBA and any other sport for that matter don't even come close to football by a long-shot. And in terms of revenue generation of sports teams between football and basketball, the Cowboys are number 1 in terms of revenue generation for the NFL at well over 500 million, while the Lakers at number 1 are around 180 million. The lowest team in the NFL in terms of revenue generation is the Raiders at 229 million is is still more than the Lakers.

    The lowest ranked team in terms of value and revenue generation beats out the Lakers by a lot.
  20. bounce

    bounce Active Member

    692 Messages
    206 Likes Received
    He's being sarcastic because of the Spurs love in here.
    khiladi likes this.

Share This Page