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The Weekly BEast Report: The Washington Redskins Offseason

Discussion in 'NFL Zone' started by CCBoy, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    The Weekly BEast Report: The Washington Redskins Offseason
    By DawnMacelli@BTB_Macelli on Jul 17 2014, 7:30p 12
    http://www.bloggingtheboys.com/2014...east-report-the-washington-redskins-offseason


    [IMG] <img src="http://cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/cho...252/20131119_kkt_ah7_694.0_standard_730.0.jpg" alt=""/>
    Brace Hemmelgarn-USA TODAY Sport

    With one divisional foe's offseason review completed, the time has come to take a look at another of the teams that the Dallas Cowboys will have to outperform to earn a date to the NFL's post-season dance. Today's subject is the squad from our nation's capitol.

    Following a return to the NFL Playoffs after the 2012 season, the Washington Redskins reverted back to their recent history by posting a 3-13 record to secure the earliest draft slot of any NFC East team. Sure the temptation is there to say that this was due to the Skins woes that came from having a starting quarterback who was hampered by the effects of an offseason knee surgery, but the truth is that the problem runs much deeper than just the passer's limitations. There were and may still be a plethora of issues in Washington.

    As bad as the team was, the biggest distraction has to be from off the playing field. Sure there was the on-going dispute over the team's nickname, but that is not to what I refer. The team was forced to deal with a public feud between head coach Mike Shanahan, offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan, and second-year quarterback Robert Griffin III. There was no possible way that the team could prosper under those circumstances. The rift was too large and it was obvious very early in the season that somebody was going to have to go.

    In spite of the obvious problems faced by the offense, the defensive side of the locker room did not fare any better. A dearth of talent plagued the Washington defense, and what talent that they did have was well past its prime. I have nothing but respect for London Fletcher, but even though the spirit may be willing the flesh is no longer able. This is especially true when there is no supporting cast. The Washington defense was down-right terrible.

    When a team allows at least 27 points in a game 10 times in a season, more than 30 points in a game six times, and more than 40 points three times, that's not a great formula for winning.

    Dan Snyder and the Redskins front office entered the off season with plenty of opportunities to make improvements. From a Washington perspective, that means that there is a pretty good chance that anything that they try will help make the team better. It also means that it is not likely that Snyder and his staff can resolve all their issues in one offseason...
  2. Denim Chicken

    Denim Chicken Well-Known Member

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    The Skins should get a boost from the coaching change, but I think that their Defense will still be an issue (really bad secondary). I predict that RGIII will play closer to what he did last year than what he did his rookie season when he was aided by the novelty of the Pistol. Not sure if he lasts all 16 games. My guess is Hatcher's knee keeps him out a few games as well and we know he is just OK in the 3-4.

    My prediction 6-10
  3. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    The Pistol is a formation, not really a "novelty". It's no more a novelty than the shotgun. I think you're meaning to say the read-option.

    RG3 stayed healthy all last season while still coming back from serious knee surgery. Not sure why he wouldn't/couldn't stay just as healthy this season. And he took a ton of hits last year, too.

    At any rate, Gruden prefers a passing offense where the QB gets rid of the ball quickly (at least that's what I've read lol), which should help in keeping Griffin upright at least.

    Our secondary last year was really bad, you're right. This year should see real improvement, especially if David Amerson improves on his rookie season, Phillip Thomas stays healthy and keeps improving (he's been impressive so far), and Ryan Clark has at least one more quality year in him...not to mention if the QB pressure from the front 7 also improves. Scheme changes and the additions of Hatcher and (hopefully) Trent Murphy could/should help in that regard. And Hatcher was more than "just ok" in the 3-4.

    As for the write-up, eh, it was pretty accurate, I think. They summed up the Skins realistically at the end:

    They 2014 edition of the Washington Redskins will be much better than the 2013 unit, simply because they have started down the road to recovery. It is a lot to ask for anyone to expect more than that and Washington should be expected to finish in the cellar of the division once again. The real question is going to be how much have they improved? Only time will give us that answer, but they should be better. With a couple breaks this club could threaten to go 8-8 and as we have seen in recent years, that record can get you in contention right up until the last game is played. Don't count Washington out this season, but they are at least a year, and more likely two years away.
  4. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    Secondary:

    31. Washington
    [IMG]

    John Bazemore/Associated Press
    Starters: DeAngelo Hall, Brandon Meriweather, Ryan Clark, David Amerson

    Key Contributors: Bashaud Breeland, E.J. Biggers, Phillip Thomas, Tracy Porter

    Defense has not been a strong suit in Washington for quite some time, and in 2014, the secondary will once again be the weak link of a team that's hoping for a big offensive output to keep it in games each week.

    DeAngelo Hall headlines this secondary and is a fitting representation of the play here—loud, overrated and over the hill. Hall, Meriweather and Clark are past their prime, and it shows on Sundays. They may be the more recognizable names, but their time is short with youngsters like Bashaud Breeland and Phillip Thomas coming up through the ranks.

    The future is brighter in Washington than the present (isn't that always the case in D.C.?), but the 2014 season could be a tough one on the secondary.

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2130146-power-ranking-nfl-secondary-depth-charts/page/3
  5. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    If this is where the Skins analysis goes:

    NFL's top receiving corps: Redskins, Bears lead the way

    [...]Given some time to study the tape and depth charts of every team in the NFL, I thought I would rank my top five receiving corps based on overall talent and diversity. While plenty of teams boast one elite receiver, just a handful of squads have multiple threats good enough to take over the game. Here is how my list shakes out:

    1) Washington Redskins
    The corps: DeSean Jackson, Pierre Garcon, Andre Roberts and Jordan Reed

    Heading into the 2014 season, the pressure is squarely on the shoulders of new coach Jay Gruden and Robert Griffin III to maximize a talent-laden unit. The Redskins have assembled a group of pass-catchers with the size (Reed checks in at 6-foot-2 and 243 pounds), speed (Jackson), explosiveness (Garcon) and quickness (Roberts) to torment defensive coordinators around the NFL. While most rosters feature a number of playmakers on the perimeter, few teams can rival the production delivered by the crew in Washington.

    Garcon, a seventh-year pro, amassed 1,346 receiving yards on 113 receptions last season -- the highest total in the NFL. Garcon is not a classic No. 1 receiver in terms of size and route-running ability, but he is a "catch-and-run" playmaker with exceptional running skills. He excels at shaking free from defenders in traffic, which makes him a dangerous threat in the quick-screen game.

    Jackson put together a career year with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2013, posting 82 catches for 1,332 yards -- the ninth-best yardage total in the NFL, one spot behind Garcon -- and nine touchdowns, and when he was released this offseason, it didn't take long for the Redskins to add him. Jackson is one of the most explosive playmakers in the NFL. In his six-year career, he's posted 35 receptions of 40 yards or more -- including eight last season, when he also averaged 16.2 yards per catch. The speedster has the burst and acceleration to blow past defenders on vertical routes; opposing defensive coordinators are forced to account for him on every play.

    Reed and Roberts, meanwhile, are dangerous options between the hashes. Each is a capable route-runner over the middle, possessing the quickness and burst to separate from defenders on option routes. Reed in particular is a dependable chain-mover at tight end; last season, 66.7 percent of his receptions resulted in a first down. That's significant production for a playmaker assigned to do damage between the hashes.

    It's hard to find a more complete receiving corps in the NFL. Thus, the Redskins earn the top ranking on my list.


    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap20...p-receiving-corps-redskins-bears-lead-the-way
  6. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    With the tight ends and running backs in the mix, strictly on receivers...I'm feeling that between the Cowboys and Washington, it is about a push.

    But when adding in the secondary influence, Dallas gets an advantage as to overall effectiveness.
  7. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    Who are the Cowboys #3 and #4 WRs? Beasley and Harris?
  8. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    Beasley has proven 3rd down dependable. He also is moving into Welker type considerations as to improving as time progressed. Harris is one of the top special teams returners, and has been for three seasons now. He is more adept to situational use, but has strong receiving skill and can turn a play around on a dime.

    I think that potential on the side of Street and Chris Boyd.

    As to wishing upon a star...Washington comes to mind. He's a longshot for now.

    If injury occurred, I would be looking towards Boyd.
  9. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    If speaking "strictly receivers" as you said, then I don't see the Skins and Cowboys being a push...I think the Skins are solidly ahead, at least if you take the entirety of the receiving corp. If you add in TEs, then it's much closer to a push--Witten is far more proven than Reed, regardless of his age...although I wouldn't be too shocked if Reed ended up doing better this year than Witten. Add in RBs (the articles doesn't include RBs), then it probably tips the favor towards Dallas. Although Morris is never really utilized in the passing game, Helu (the #2 RB) is very good in that regard.
  10. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    Easily remedied...as first comment by myself was receivers...and already explained. As to running backs, in a comparison between Morris and Murray, Demarcus leaves him at the line. I also would go with Dunbar over Helu. But Dallas has a 2nd tight end that projects on par with a Reed from the start. And did one notice that Jason Witten is in better shape and lost a little extra weight as well?

    Jackson declined in production in Philadelphia over the past two seasons, as did the passing effectiveness of Griffin last season and a half.

    More swings in favor of Dallas, and the secondary wasn't given a wisp in the above mention. There, Washington was much more of a stumbling block, than even the Dallas secondary with a hindrance of a hotel lobby at defensive line.
  11. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    Why would you go with Dunbar over Helu?

    And a TE that has produced easily trumps one that "projects" to produce. I already gave the nod solidly to Witten.


    Wait...Griffin's passing effectiveness declined over the last season and a half? That "half" season in 2012 when he threw 8 TDs in 5 days against the Eagles and Cowboys, and finished with the 2nd highest passer rating over that "half" season? THAT was a decline in passing effectiveness? lol...

    No question his effectiveness declined last season, but let's not act like it's due to nothing more than him not really being that good. I doubt there's been a 2nd year QB in the history of the NFL who could have overcome major knee surgery, completely missing the offseason and preseason, his team being handicapped by a bogus $18 million salary cap "penalty", atrocious Special Teams play that constantly put him and his offense in a hole, an absolutely crappy defense, and a dysfunctional coaching staff, and still lift his team to anything remotely resembling respectability.

    As for Jackson, quick question: who is the better WR, Jackson or Williams? Not who might be 4 years from now lol...who is now?

    Not sure what the secondary has to do with the WR corps we were comparing (??)...
  12. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    Washington's is being valued a lot less than is the secondary of Dallas. This should mean that getting open is harder against the Dallas secondary, and would affect degree of effectiveness by Jackson. Last season, against Dallas, Jackson didn't have much success to begin with.

    I feel that Griffin is a solid quarterback. But in the early and formative period of his development, to be taken out of the mix, has to have a degree of lingering affects upon his performances.

    Washington still has another year to wade through, not a mark on the franchise, but still relevant to look at when comparing teams for this next season.

    Anything that crowns Washington before the season, is premature...but despite obvious questions about the defensive front, I'm betting that the Dallas box area improves and can match production of Washington, but in the secondary, Dallas, warts and all, should be better.
  13. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    As to Reed, I'm not holding my breath about him pushing Jason Witten off the board:

    Jordan Reed
    +[IMG]

    Tight End #86
    Washington Redskins

    STATS/REC/YDS/AVG/TD/LONG
    2013 Season...45...499...11.1...3...38
  14. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    It wasn't crowning the Skins for anything...it was taking one segment of the entire team--the receivers, specifically the top 3 WRs and the #1 TE--and saying that "based on overall talent and diversity" he felt the Redskins ranked #1. That's the only thing my last few posts to you were about as well. Brooks puts an importance on diversity that I think fans generally do not. He goes into an explanation as to why he does, you can click on the link and read it if you're bored enough lol...

    But again, it wasn't a ranking of passing offenses...
  15. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    You realized Reed only played 9 games, right?...and only started 4 of those games?

    Receptions per game
    Witten - 4.6
    Reed - 5.0

    Yards per game
    Witten - 53.2
    Reed - 55.4

    Yards per catch
    Witten - 11.7
    Reed - 11.1

    TDs per game
    Witten - .50
    Reed - .34


    In his rookie season, he was right there with Witten in terms of stats. His route running is incredibly impressive, and he has very soft hands.

    Reed was named one of the players "Making The Leap" this season on NFL.com. Here's their description:

    A hard truth gleaned from the unenviable task of 2013 Redskins tape study: Robert Griffin III trusted only two men when throwing the football. One was Pierre Garcon, an established talent who led the NFL with 113 receptions. The other was Reed, a rookie third-round pick who developed in hyper speed.

    Reed is often compared to a pre-incarceration Aaron Hernandez for a reason. He possesses many of the same tools that once made the former Patriots tight end a rising star. Reed has speed, power and soft hands -- the big three for the modern-day pass-catching tight end. He's a strong route-runner and capable blocker who doesn't shy away from contact. His unusual athleticism makes him a movable threat.

    Reed didn't just marginalize Fred Davis on the Redskins' offense; Davis was a brontosaurus and Reed the fiery meteor. He set franchise rookie records at tight end in catches (45) and yards (499) over just nine games. Reed had 32 catches from Week 6 to Week 11, eight more than any tight end in football."
  16. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    I assume that you are basing your high level of production, not upon Reed, but upon this:

    Garcon, a seventh-year pro, amassed 1,346 receiving yards on 113 receptions last season -- the highest total in the NFL. Garcon is not a classic No. 1 receiver in terms of size and route-running ability, but he is a "catch-and-run" playmaker with exceptional running skills. He excels at shaking free from defenders in traffic, which makes him a dangerous threat in the quick-screen game.

    Jackson put together a career year with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2013, posting 82 catches for 1,332 yards -- the ninth-best yardage total in the NFL, one spot behind Garcon -- and nine touchdowns, and when he was released this offseason, it didn't take long for the Redskins to add him. Jackson is one of the most explosive playmakers in the NFL. In his six-year career, he's posted 35 receptions of 40 yards or more -- including eight last season, when he also averaged 16.2 yards per catch. The speedster has the burst and acceleration to blow past defenders on vertical routes; opposing defensive coordinators are forced to account for him on every play.

    Reed and Roberts, meanwhile, are dangerous options between the hashes. Each is a capable route-runner over the middle, possessing the quickness and burst to separate from defenders on option routes. Reed in particular is a dependable chain-mover at tight end; last season, 66.7 percent of his receptions resulted in a first down. That's significant production for a playmaker assigned to do damage between the hashes.

    http://espn.go.com/blog/washington-redskins/post/_/id/1126/redskins-need-more-wr-production

    The question immediately comes down to this, in production...what was the total yardage, offensively for Dallas and what was it for Washington? Beyond that, we are projecting, and then factors presented outside just a receiver projection, comes into play...
  17. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    To me, this picture projection between a Dallas/Washington window, boils to who you feel has the best chance of running the Division. Here, I have to say Dallas over Washington.
  18. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    What the...lol. What are you talking about?

    First, all you did was re-quote what I posted above.

    Second, your link doesn't match what you quoted.

    Third, I already said what I based my thoughts about Reed on.

    Fourth, I never said Reed would have a "high level of production", I only said I wouldn't be shocked if he did.

    Fifth, the article I DID quote from pretty much says the same thing:

    "Reed developed quickly as a rookie, and we project continued growth in his second season. A 70/1,000/8 slash line isn't crazy talk. Stay healthy, kid."

    Sixth, I still have no clue what you're actually talking about lol...
  19. Califan007

    Califan007 Well-Known Member

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    ???...

    Who's talking about winning the division?
  20. CCBoy

    CCBoy Well-Known Member

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    Cool, Washington is the greatest...end of debate.

    Now, you want to powder your gun with that powder, Son, go ahead...just stay out of Law School in California with visions of great wealth.

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