CFZ Money and "head in the clouds" issues

DonaldM

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I just want clothes and bling like Burrows and a car with big *** blades and a vibrating trunk.
 

Flamma

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I just want clothes and bling like Burrows and a car with big *** blades and a vibrating trunk.

For myself, I prefer a chariot. They come with blades too. All that bling would give me a stiff neck, that's why I don't wear it. That's what I tell myself.

The dude is living the life. I can't want to see what he and Herbert get after this upcoming season.

Just nitpicking here, it's Burrow without the S. I think I spelled it with the S for an entire year.
 

Hardline

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Pro athletes make the money they do because many ******* fans sell out stadiums and empty merch shelves every year.
People don't buy thousands of tickets each year to see a teacher and police officers do their jobs.
 

conner01

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Can you imagine suddenly getting paid tens of millions of dollars at age 22? For some of us, that was when we graduated college. For others, it was a couple years after high school and a trade school. But wherever you were at age 22, imagine suddenly being a millionaire.

That's the case of very high-round NFL draft picks. If you had just been a star player in college and now suddenly you've got insane amounts of money, you would feel like you've got life by the horns. You've achieved your dreams. Yet, when a highly touted draft pick gets signed for millions, but hasn't played a game yet, he has accomplished exactly nothing yet in the NFL.

I can see how suddenly having that much money and being told how great he is could go to a young guy's head. He might feel invincible, as if his NFL success is somehow predestined. It seems to me that's how a very talented young player could wind up a draft bust.

In reality, he's accomplished nothing in the NFL until he's won some games, and the talent level is way, way higher in the NFL compared to the NCAA. Someone who realizes that will know to get focused off the money and glamor and to start busting butt to learn his team's system, and everything he can to become a high-level NFL player. Raw talent alone can't make someone a great player. No matter how talented a player is, only a huge amount of work will make him an effective player.

When Ryan Leaf was with the Cowboys, I saw some innate skills in him and hoped that he had kind of learned his lessons and could work hard to develop into a great player. Obviously, that did not happen. It makes me wonder what could have been if he had immediately gotten a great mentor to tell him, “Don't buy into all the hype. All that stuff about how great you are is all bull. You have to build up a great work ethic to make it in this league.”

I wonder if a Ryan Leaf, plus a Jerry-Rice-level work ethic would equal a great player.

The league has way more money than it used to, and, of course, top-level draft picks get paid way more up front than they used to. Obviously, there's no way to return to how things were in previous decades, so it does make me wonder what teams may do to avoid “head in the clouds” situations. No matter how great a college career a player has had, he's not guaranteed a good NFL career. And paying him a huge pile of money up front also doesn't guarantee that he'll play well in the NFL.

It makes me wonder if teams have a “get his head out of the clouds” department, or if they use sports psychologists or whatever. I'm not against paying a player what the market will bear. That's just part of the business. It just makes me wonder if teams have to take counter measures to prevent that very money they just paid him from working against him.
No doubt it’s hard to motivate a kid with millions of dollars. And there have been many cases where they ruined their careers and their lives because of it
The league offers all kinds of help to help them protect their money but the key is finding guys who love the game, have the to much pride to not give it their all
It’s hard to judge a man’s heart but if there is any question of their love for the game I sure don’t want to pick them high in the draft
 

conner01

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Professional athletes make way too much money, but I guess it’s what the market will bear. I’m a capitalist, so I always say let the market determine who gets paid. Society is the problem. We place more value on our entertainment than anything else (yes, I’m guilty as well). That’s why athletes, actors, and musicians are among the highest paid people. We should value law enforcement, teachers (the good ones, not the nuts), our military, researchers, medical personnel, etc. the most, but we don’t. That’s why the county is in such bad shape. Our priorities are screwed up.
It’s not really about what we value but what we spend our money own
Athletes, musician’s and actors make what they make because they produce a product people want, including everyone here who watches the games

it’s no different than any other product people buy
If someone buys it then those who produce it make money
I think everyone would agree teachers, firemen, police officers are under paid. But those jobs don’t provide a product people can buy
They are careers that taxpayers pay for and honestly don’t appreciate enough. But to pay them more means taxpayers have to pay more in taxes and that’s a hard sale
 

conner01

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They have numerous resources and most pro sports have orientations for rookies to come in to talk about relationships with women, getting financial advisors and ones that are sponsored by the league they are with so their money doesnt go missing.

At 22 i already had a kid was on child support and was sellin drugs. I was buggin and i was broke. Couldnt imagine havin that much bread at that time of my life.
Giving me millions at 22 would have been a disaster and would have been for most people here
You just don’t have the maturity needed
 

conner01

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Maybe you need to get some people together to agree to pay more taxes to help out your preferred professions. Let me know how that movement goes.
That’s reality
If you want public service jobs like teachers or police to make more then you have to increase the funding to them which is taxes
 

conner01

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Your I.Q. probably can’t get any lower than it already is if you don’t get my point. The question is how important is their job. You seem to think the world would stop spinning if there were no professional athletes.
Its not about how important your job is. That has never been and never will be why you get paid a certain amount. It’s about the revenue your job creates and who gets that revenue. It’s been the same since the beginning of time. If you have something or provide a service people want then they pay you for it. If your job is more of a public service job like a teacher or cop then you are paid by taxes which people hate to pay
If people want public service jobs to pay more then they have to pay more. But for profit companies provide a product or service we want and are willing to pay for

That’s not a problem with society since that’s been the case since the beginning of time
 

MarcusRock

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No idea what this has to do with the topic at hand. I’m pretty sure no one is advocating for more government. I’m damn sure not. The less the better.

You're the one to take the OP's post off-topic. He talked about players having a lot of money and the possibility of it taking his focus off their games and whether teams have a failsafe for that. Then you pipe in with "society's priorities are WRONG to have players making that much!" So I'm basically asking if you'd do better in another type of society that forces society to choose the "correct" priorities so you'd stress a little less.
 

Proof

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I think so, yes. The higher the pay, the more competition for the job. So at some point you're left with the best.

The problem is some of these so called important jobs don't bring income to their employer. Although important, they are a monetary drain on society. The state isn't making any money off them. It's a lot easier for a business or franchise to pay their employees whatever necessary as long as the return is much higher.

yeah that's the elephant in the room. Where would the money come from? Because as soon as it's taxes that's a whole nother ball of wax lol
 

Proof

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The same ppl that say these things oppose raising minimum wage for the "essential workers". Please spare me

not me. but i'm not here to argue. just think think teachers / doctors / first responders etc should be rich for what they contribute to the world.
 

Proof

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One of my favorite stories of athletes not understanding money is the one where Ricky Henderson framed his $1m bonus check rather than cashing it and the team had to ask him why the money did not clear off their books.

lmao
 

xwalker

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Many people are qualified to be law enforcement and teachers, not many people are qualified to be actors or athletes or doctors thus the disparity in pay.
Not really. Many people currently in law enforcement wouldn't be qualified if the pay was a million+ per year.
- A high salary would attract people with much better qualifications and therefore, the qualification standards would be raised.

Same issue with teachers.
- If schools could set the qualifications to what they really want without regards to cost, then the quantity of people qualified for the job would be much much smaller.
 

rags747

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Not really. Many people currently in law enforcement wouldn't be qualified if the pay was a million+ per year.
- A high salary would attract people with much better qualifications and therefore, the qualification standards would be raised.

Same issue with teachers.
- If schools could set the qualifications to what they really want without regards to cost, then the quantity of people qualified for the job would be much much smaller.
Sure, the same can be said for offering fast food workers $100k to start. You will definitely increase the level of talent flipping burgers and fries but is that really needed? Cops get some of the best benefits offered, great retirement plans and pensions and most have access to overtime. We need more highly qualified engineers in this country not more highly qualified cops imo. Teachers also have great benefits, lots of vacation and fantastic pensions. Math today is math tomorrow, it doesn’t change. Geography today is the same as tomorrow. Now go out and be an investment banker, the subject matter changes daily. Become an athlete or entertainer or doctor, constant reinvention is ongoing until you retire, not so with a cop or a teacher. I think the salaries are fine where they are.
 

sunalsorises

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Allen Iverson forgot where he parked at the airport so rather than look for his car he went to the dealer and bought a new one. I’m guessing he didn’t buy a Toyota or Honda. Allegedly he didn’t pack for road games because he would just buy what he needed once he got to his destination.
 

Reverend Conehead

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No doubt it’s hard to motivate a kid with millions of dollars. And there have been many cases where they ruined their careers and their lives because of it
The league offers all kinds of help to help them protect their money but the key is finding guys who love the game, have the to much pride to not give it their all
It’s hard to judge a man’s heart but if there is any question of their love for the game I sure don’t want to pick them high in the draft

I agree 100 percent. They can help players with the best info available on avoiding financial trouble, not letting the money go to their heads, etc., but you're totally right that there's no guarantee that they'll listen. I'm with you on wanting players who love the game. Guys like that will give their all because their dream is winning a Super Bowl. Their dream isn't owning a lot of cool stuff. Guys who play for the love of the game will hire the best accountant they can find, and make smart choices based on their advice, and then they'll bust butt so learn and improve in every way possible with the goal of winning a championship.

Would you rather have your 80th birthday knowing you had given it your all and had helped your team win a championship or would you rather have driven a really nice Ferarri? I know for me the Ferarri doesn't even remotely have the same value as a Super Bowl ring that I earned.
 

plasticman

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. "A 2009 Sports Illustrated story claimed that 78% of former NFL players were bankrupt or experiencing financial stress because of losing their job or getting divorced within two years of leaving the league."

https://www.sportscasting.com/5-famous-nfl-players-who-lost-their-fortunes/

I think the greatest issue is that they see the NFL as a career and it typically lasts only for a few years. Many of them don't emphasize their education while in college so they truly come away with nothing once the money dries out.

It seems to me that there is probably some correlation in the number of players that do not graduate and experience financial issues after the NFL Treating their education seriously is probably a sign of maturity that many college players lack going into the NFL.

I don't see how they could do it but it's really a shame that NFL players aren't required to graduate before being drafted. If a player's career in teh NFL ends up being short, they still have a college degree to base a career on. At the very least it's a definite advantage.
 

cowboyed

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With all that gravy I still would live the simple life such as sitting around naked in my man cave and counting my money.
 

Reverend Conehead

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. "A 2009 Sports Illustrated story claimed that 78% of former NFL players were bankrupt or experiencing financial stress because of losing their job or getting divorced within two years of leaving the league."

https://www.sportscasting.com/5-famous-nfl-players-who-lost-their-fortunes/

I think the greatest issue is that they see the NFL as a career and it typically lasts only for a few years. Many of them don't emphasize their education while in college so they truly come away with nothing once the money dries out.

It seems to me that there is probably some correlation in the number of players that do not graduate and experience financial issues after the NFL Treating their education seriously is probably a sign of maturity that many college players lack going into the NFL.

I don't see how they could do it but it's really a shame that NFL players aren't required to graduate before being drafted. If a player's career in teh NFL ends up being short, they still have a college degree to base a career on. At the very least it's a definite advantage.

That is really a shame. You would think they would know that an NFL career isn't one you can do until you're 65. You normally can't even do it until you're 40. In some cases a player gets the injury bug and is only in the league a year or two. I can't think of any other profession where immediately handling your money extremely well while young is more important. Well, maybe modeling or other sports. But if you made millions of dollars a year for only 5 years, and then didn't waste it and instead tucked it into smart investments, you could be good for life. If you go nuts with spending, you could easily be broke when the NFL gig is up, or worse. You could even be deep in debt, but now with no high-paying career.

Maybe many of them just don't listen. All that "you're so great" BS has gone to their heads.

A really good accountant and financial planner is worth every penny, as is the ability to not let stuff go to your head.
 
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