True Crime thread

Discussion in 'Off-topic Zone' started by MichaelWinicki, Mar 29, 2021.

  1. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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  2. SlammedZero

    SlammedZero Well-Known Member

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    Really hate seeing these stories. They hide behind their badge and prey on those trusting them to protect them from the very monsters that they are. Sad. Too bad he never got to meet his justice.
     
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  3. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    And this guy was a "double-bad"– Bad cop and a bad religious leader.

    Only good that came of it was that the case was solved– they know who did it. Just like the case posted earlier in the week about the 11 yo girl, murdered in 1964 and her killer dying of natural causes in 1980.

    The remaining family members of the killer end up on the losing end also.
     
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  4. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    One of the judges took time to point out that Bundy would have made one heck of an arbitrator if his life would have took a different turn. From everything that I have read and the videos that I have watched, Bundy was a very skilled speaker and he had the ability to hold the entire court’s attention in a way that very few lawyers are able to do. Bundy was similar to several of the other serial killers that had very high IQs. Ed Kemper was another serial killer that possessed a very high IQ. It is kind of spooky knowing that these serial killers were much more intelligent than the law enforcement officers that was trying to catch them.
     
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  5. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    I have noticed that it is almost a weekly occurrence for one or two cold cases to be solved using modern DNA technology. I read an article this morning that told the story of a 38 year old cold case that was solved by using the same DNA techniques that was used in solving the Golden State Killer case. It is amazing just how far investigations have come in my lifetime. I just turned 55 on February the 15th. The investigative tools and techniques have advanced so much in my lifetime that it makes me wonder just how much more they can improve in the next few decades.
     
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  6. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    It's "head spinning" how far forensics have come...

    The sample size needed continues to get smaller and the speed they can process that sample has increased appreciably.

    And a number suspects have basically given up as soon as the police stopped by to inquire what the suspect knew about the case, such as the April Tinsley case... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_April_Tinsley, where the police stopped by John Miller's mobile home and they asked Miller if he know why they were their and he said "April Tinsley".

    In the case of Jessica Braggen, the suspect committed suicide after the police stopped by to collect a DNA sample, he refused and they left to get the court authorization and he soon after shot himself. https://dps.alaska.gov/getmedia/b44...954b54/20-024-Jessica-Baggen-Cold-Case-Solved

    He knew what was going to happen.
     
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  7. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    For those interested in the Edmund Kemper case, check out this blog... http://edmundkemperstories.com/ which contains a wealth of articles, images and opinions on him and his crimes.

    Also of interest is his most recent mug-shot dating from 2020.

    Over the years he's put on considerable weight and had a stroke in 2015.
     
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  8. SlammedZero

    SlammedZero Well-Known Member

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    I absolutely love(d) the show Forensic Files. Pretty sure I've seen every one of them. Anyway, some of them just blow your mind on the minute things they can collect to catch a perpetrator. Almost no such thing as a perfect crime anymore, as chances are, you left behind a mistake.
     
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  9. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    I watched a documentary ("Living With Evil") on the ID Channel this weekend and they profiled Charles Sinclair, the "Coin Shop Killer".

    Starting around 1980 he would venture out on "road trips" away from his family and would come back weeks or even months later–quite often bringing home a collection of coins and other colletables.

    What he was doing was casing coin shops in different parts of the country and in several instances would end up killing whomever (usually with a gunshot to the head) was working in the shop when he decided now was the time to rob it and blow town.

    He was connected to 11 murders and 1 attempted murder.

    He was ultimately captured in 1990 based on evidence he had left behind from his last robbery.

    Anyway, during all this he one day asked his teenage daughter at the time "What would be the perfect crime?"

    He strikes me a lot like BTK in that he was arrogant.

    Unfortunately he never received the justice deserved in that he died in custody from a heart attack 77 days after being arrested.
     
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  10. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    We are quickly coming to the point where getting away with murder will be a thing from the past. I don’t know how much of a deterrent that the advances in forensics will have on the serial killers, or any killer for that matter, that kills on impulse. From what I have read, the impulse killers are totally controlled by the impulse to kill their victims immediately, without any thought of the consequences. It brings into question which impulse would win out . Would the impulse to kill win out over the impulse of self preservation? I can’t understand my fascination with serial killers, spree killers and horrific murders as a whole. I am worried that I like the topic entirely too much.
     
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  11. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    Yeah, impulse killers will always be around to one extent or another and the very worst won't be stopped by forensics. But they aren't the serial killers of yesterday–Instead they're the mass shooters of today who plan on blowing their wad in a one-off situation where they are either killed or taken custody.

    I do believe that improved forensics, a more unified police system across the country and the presence of phones and video cameras everywhere have greatly cut down "stranger on stranger" violence.
     
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  12. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    It's fascination from several points-of-view...

    We want to know why or what makes them do what they do.

    We're fascinated by the "cat & mouse" between the perpetrator and the victim along with that between the authorities/legal system and the perpetrator.

    We're also fascinated and scared by "monsters" and those that commit these heinous crimes are monsters.

    I would bet many that see this thread do not open it simply because they're scared of what they'll read.
     
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  13. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    Last thing on Ed Kemper...

    This is a prime example of how "behind" the authorities were in dealing with serial killers early on.

    After Ed murdered his mother and his mother's best friend he took off because he figured he was not going to be able to hide these killings–Not knowing were he was going he headed east.

    He ended up near Pueblo, Colorado, where he decided it simply wasn't going to work (trying to escape) and wanted to turn himself in.

    He stopped by a pay phone at about 4:00AM in the morning and calling the police back in California where he murdered his mother.

    He didn't get anywhere. The policeman handling the phones thought Ed was a crack-pot and hung-up.

    Kemper made 4 different phone calls over the course of several hours before he finally got someone to believe his story... And this only occurred because Ed asked the police to go check out his home where they would find his two latest victims.

    They did, called him back and arranged for the Pueblo Police Dept to apprehend him at the phone booth.

    Anyway, if anyone would like to read the book "Ed Kemper-Conversations With A Killer" just pop me a message and I'll send it to you–Book has been claimed!
     
  14. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    The very thought of finding a child sexually attractive is sickening to say the least. From what I understand, these people can not change from any type of therapy or treatment programs. There is simply no hope at all that they can be cured , so the question facing society is “what to do with them”? If it was left up to me, they would face the death penalty. The evidence would have to be overwhelming to resort to that level of punishment, but it is hard to justify society taking care of these criminals. If a 20 year old guy commits the crime, there is a high probability that society would pay the bill for over 60 years of prison time. Any suggestions on what we should do with these people?
     
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  15. jnday

    jnday Well-Known Member

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    I guess I should point out that my wife is more concerned about my fascination than I am. LOL She gets a little nervous when one of these crime channels have a whole weekend of serial killer programming.
     
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  16. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    LOL!

    I don't know... Is it any worse than watching "Die Hard" marathon where people are killed left or right or a marathon of NCIS where at least one person is going to die per episode?

    My wife like British mystery series... At least one person per show is getting knocked off...

    We're surrounded by TV shows and movies where someone is killing someone else (not too mention our video games).

    Again it's not about "Wow look at how many kills that serial killer had!"

    As I posted up above there are a variety of reasons I think most of us find those shows compelling.
     
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  17. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    I don't know what to do with them other than what we are right now...

    Lock'em up and throw away the key.

    The death penalty is a tough one because mistakes have been made and will continue to be made where the innocent are put to death.
     
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  18. MichaelWinicki

    MichaelWinicki "You want some?" Moderator

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    OK, last thing on Ed Kemper... Promise!

    This has to do with how the state of California handled his case after he shot & killed his grandparents in 1964...

    The state did not have place to put the then 15yo given he was both young and had some mental issues.

    So what did the state do?

    They stuck him in a state run mental criminal mental hospital with adult patients– all of which had criminal pasts.

    So what does a 15yo do in that situation?

    He absorbs the "war stories" of the adult criminal mental patients. Many of whom were sexual deviants.

    Obviously this didn't help Ed Kemper get better.

    On top of that, as we know, Ed Kemper was smart–Very smart.

    He was a model prisoner and because of that he was given the job of delivering patient paperwork within the facility.

    He read that paperwork.

    And from that he learned what Dr's wanted to hear from patients in order to make the patient appear "normal" and "rehabbed".

    That's enabled Ed Kemper to get out of the facility in 1969 and was considered "No threat to society".

    Ed "played" the system and won.

    In addition the Dr's in the facility knew Ed had an issue with his mother.

    So who did they push Ed off on?

    His mother. The one person who knew how to "push his buttons".

    The rest as they say is or was history.
     
  19. SlammedZero

    SlammedZero Well-Known Member

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    I had my first "wow, I'm getting old" experience the other day. I'm playing a multi-person online video game and I run around this corner of a map. I get shot and suddenly the animation shows my head blowing off. I sat there for a second thinking "Wow. That was a bit much. Are we, as society, glorify violence and gore?" While I am older and still enjoy playing video games, a lot of those are marketed (and played) by our youth. So I'm not sure if it's just my maturation in life or my stance on violence, but that was the first time I can remember sitting there questioning a video game presentation.

    Plus, it just seems all backwards to me. We can have a woman's nipple slip out on national TV, and the country will lose it's mind, but it's ok if we can turn on the TV and see somebody's head getting blown off or somebody emptying a gun magazine into somebody.
     
  20. Crazed Liotta Eyes

    Crazed Liotta Eyes Well-Known Member

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    Very well said my friend. I'm not in favor of censorship but the standards for nudity and violence in this country are very bizarre. Admit it though, you were more upset that you got your dome melted. :grin:
     
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